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Old Sep 7, 2014, 09:49 PM   #1
Ryllini
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I am in the process of selling my condo and buying a new home. I have a contract to sell my place and waiting to get the contract signed by the seller for my new home. Anyways, I am tentatively setting up an inspection and was just wondering what anyone's thoughts are on the radon testing. Should I do it? I figure I should, since I am spending large money on a home, but part of me thinks it is a waste, since radon levels change daily. This has been a nerve-wracking process and I figure with some of the intelligent people we have here and younger people moving through lives, this would be a good thread to seek advice from should you need an outside source.

Last edited by Dan; Sep 8, 2014 at 05:35 AM.
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Old Sep 7, 2014, 10:13 PM   #2
hermie1985
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Basement?
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Old Sep 7, 2014, 10:16 PM   #3
DaytonIllini
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryllini View Post
I am in the process of selling my condo and buying a new home. I have a contract to sell my place and waiting to get the contract signed by the seller for my new home. Anyways, I am tentatively setting up an inspection and was just wondering what anyone's thoughts are on the radon testing. Should I do it? I figure I should, since I am spending large money on a home, but part of me thinks it is a waste, since radon levels change daily. This has been a nerve-wracking process and I figure with some of the intelligent people we have here and younger people moving through lives, this would be a good thread to seek advice from should you need an outside source.
Obviously just my opinion. Definitely test. Radon is expensive to mitigate if the house has a significant problem. The seller can game the test by leaving windows open during the testing or even moving the test kit outside but most people are not that scummy. If the house has a major problem I would think the seller would have to pay to mitigate. After all if you walk away, he has to disclose the adverse radon situation.

Some inspectors have purchased devices that electronically read the alpha particles. I read a lot of reviews on those and it sounds like they are wildly ineffective. The most effective approach sounded like it was to use two 48 hour carbon test kits and mail them in RUSH.

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Last edited by Dan; Sep 8, 2014 at 05:36 AM.
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Old Sep 7, 2014, 10:16 PM   #4
Ryllini
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Basement?
Yes, a finished basement. No crawl spaces, just a solid basement that is finished.
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Old Sep 7, 2014, 10:25 PM   #5
hermie1985
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Yes, a finished basement. No crawl spaces, just a solid basement that is finished.
Would definitely test. I did and seller ended up mitigating.
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Old Sep 7, 2014, 10:29 PM   #6
Ryllini
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Originally Posted by DaytonIllini View Post
Obviously just my opinion. Definitely test. Radon is expensive to mitigate if the house has a significant problem. The seller can game the test by leaving windows open during the testing or even moving the test kit outside but most people are not that scummy. If the house has a major problem I would think the seller would have to pay to mitigate. After all if you walk away, he has to disclose the adverse radon situation.

Some inspectors have purchased devices that electronically read the alpha particles. I read a lot of reviews on those and it sounds like they are wildly ineffective. The most effective approach sounded like it was to use two 48 hour carbon test kits and mail them in RUSH.
He has the 48 hour testing kit(per our phone conversation), it is just funny with this whole process, this is one of the things that has hung me up the most.

Is there a way to completely fix the problem should there be one? Everything that I was reading was there are $1000 to $2000 fixes, but radon comes no matter what and changes daily.

I was also worried this guy might be a hard to deal with if there is a problem, but you are right, he would have to disclose the problem in the future should there be one. My wife and I are really excited at this point and are finding out that it is a fine line of what you perceive as good news and bad.
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Old Sep 7, 2014, 10:37 PM   #7
DaytonIllini
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He has the 48 hour testing kit(per our phone conversation), it is just funny with this whole process, this is one of the things that has hung me up the most.

Is there a way to completely fix the problem should there be one? Everything that I was reading was there are $1000 to $2000 fixes, but radon comes no matter what and changes daily.

I was also worried this guy might be a hard to deal with if there is a problem, but you are right, he would have to disclose the problem in the future should there be one. My wife and I are really excited at this point and are finding out that it is a fine line of what you perceive as good news and bad.
With a mitigation system, we have one, the readings are always in the 1 range. Without it they were about 6. Basically it's just a pipe that goes under the concrete pad and then up through the roof. There's a fan in there somewhere and it sucks the air from under the house and vents it outside. Outside air should come in at the same rate and outside air is almost always low in radon. There's a little water gauge on the pipe showing that the suction is working. They recommend repeating the carbon testing every 2 years I think.

I am sure that the radon levels change daily but they don't change dramatically or at least they shouldn't. If you have a house that is closed and gets a 4 reading and then you test it a few days later with the windows open you are bound to get a very different number. Violent winds will lower your reading but I am not aware of anything that raises your reading above the closed house/good weather test. Should be a worst case scenario as far as I understand it. I know a lot more about what radon can do to you physically than I do about airflow in homes though. Maybe someone will have some intimate knowledge on building.

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Old Sep 7, 2014, 10:49 PM   #8
BES76
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Yes. Below is a nice discussion of the issue in layman's terms. Unfortunately, it relies on the linear model which is flawed. However, a more recent study by Iowa finds a more concrete link (which supports the EPA's 4 pCi/L limit). Where's your new house (see map).

https://www.aarst.org/proceedings/19...ve_in_Rado.pdf
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Old Sep 7, 2014, 10:50 PM   #9
Ryllini
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Thank you guys for you input. I guess it makes sense to spend a little money on a cancer protector.
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Old Sep 7, 2014, 11:06 PM   #10
Ryllini
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I will say this to potential home buyers, definitely make a pro and con list of the houses you are considering and see the most amount of houses you can. See the houses you even know from the pictures that you probably aren't that into, but meet your criteria as far as living space, bedrooms, and bathrooms. Pictures on the MLS can do wonders and make homes look immaculate, but reality will tell a different story and vice versa.

I chose a home that is move in ready, but needs some work to make it my own that offered more space, over a smaller, but yet move in ready and do virtually nothing home. See, see, see homes is my main advice and go to the ones you are really interested in multiple times.
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