2020 NBA Draft

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#1
Players who are not automatically eligible have to declare their eligibility for the draft by notifying the NBA offices in writing no later than 60 days before the draft. For the 2020 draft, the date will fall on April 26.
 
#2
Forgottonia
Players who are not automatically eligible have to declare their eligibility for the draft by notifying the NBA offices in writing no later than 60 days before the draft. For the 2020 draft, the date will fall on April 26.
What is the deadline for pulling out of the draft? It was May 29th last year. That’s the more important date in my mind.
 
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#3
What is the deadline for pulling out of the draft? It was May 29th last year. That’s the more important date in my mind.
Since the 2016 draft, the following rules, as implemented by the NCAA Division I council for that division, are:[2]
  • Declaration for the draft no longer results in automatic loss of college eligibility. As long as a player does not sign a contract with a professional team outside the NBA, or sign with an agent, he will retain college eligibility as long as he makes a timely withdrawal from the draft.
  • NCAA players now have until 10 days after the end of the NBA Draft Combine to withdraw from the draft. Since the combine is held in mid-May, the current deadline is about five weeks after the previous mid-April deadline.
  • NCAA players may participate in the draft combine, and are allowed to attend one tryout per year with each NBA team without losing college eligibility.
  • NCAA players may now enter and withdraw from the draft up to two times without loss of eligibility. Previously, the NCAA treated a second declaration of draft eligibility as a permanent loss of college eligibility.
Since the 2016 draft, the following rules, as implemented by the NCAA Division I council for that division, are:[2]
  • Declaration for the draft no longer results in automatic loss of college eligibility. As long as a player does not sign a contract with a professional team outside the NBA, or sign with an agent, he will retain college eligibility as long as he makes a timely withdrawal from the draft.
  • NCAA players now have until 10 days after the end of the NBA Draft Combine to withdraw from the draft. Since the combine is held in mid-May, the current deadline is about five weeks after the previous mid-April deadline.
  • NCAA players may participate in the draft combine, and are allowed to attend one tryout per year with each NBA team without losing college eligibility.
  • NCAA players may now enter and withdraw from the draft up to two times without loss of eligibility. Previously, the NCAA treated a second declaration of draft eligibility as a permanent loss of college eligibility.
 
#4
Forgottonia
Since the 2016 draft, the following rules, as implemented by the NCAA Division I council for that division, are:[2]
  • Declaration for the draft no longer results in automatic loss of college eligibility. As long as a player does not sign a contract with a professional team outside the NBA, or sign with an agent, he will retain college eligibility as long as he makes a timely withdrawal from the draft.
  • NCAA players now have until 10 days after the end of the NBA Draft Combine to withdraw from the draft. Since the combine is held in mid-May, the current deadline is about five weeks after the previous mid-April deadline.
  • NCAA players may participate in the draft combine, and are allowed to attend one tryout per year with each NBA team without losing college eligibility.
  • NCAA players may now enter and withdraw from the draft up to two times without loss of eligibility. Previously, the NCAA treated a second declaration of draft eligibility as a permanent loss of college eligibility.
Since the 2016 draft, the following rules, as implemented by the NCAA Division I council for that division, are:[2]
  • Declaration for the draft no longer results in automatic loss of college eligibility. As long as a player does not sign a contract with a professional team outside the NBA, or sign with an agent, he will retain college eligibility as long as he makes a timely withdrawal from the draft.
  • NCAA players now have until 10 days after the end of the NBA Draft Combine to withdraw from the draft. Since the combine is held in mid-May, the current deadline is about five weeks after the previous mid-April deadline.
  • NCAA players may participate in the draft combine, and are allowed to attend one tryout per year with each NBA team without losing college eligibility.
  • NCAA players may now enter and withdraw from the draft up to two times without loss of eligibility. Previously, the NCAA treated a second declaration of draft eligibility as a permanent loss of college eligibility.
Good info. Thanks. I had forgotten that they can only withdraw one time.
 
#6
ESPN's updated draft board has Ayo at 64. Pretty sure that’s last pick in draft? Gotta improve on that.
You might hope that Ayo seeing something like that would be a huge motivation factor for him.....
 
#8
If Ayo needs an ESPN draft board as motivation to dominate, that's... not good.
IMHO if Ayo plays to his strengths, plays smart, drives hard, and has a pass first PG mentality while letting the shots come to him he can play his way back into the first round.. Dwill would be a great example of the type of mindset I'd like to see from him , Ayo does not have to try and win games on his own. We have good players and he can lead more effectively, take care of, share the ball and let the game come to him then he can make others better both he and our team will play much better the remainder of the year.
 
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#9
IMHO if Ayo plays to his strengths, plays smart, drives hard, and has a pass first PG mentality while letting the shots come to him he can play his way back into the first round.. Dwill would be a great example of the type of mindset I'd like to see from him , Ayo does not have to try and win games on his own. We have good players and he can lead more effectively, take care of, share the ball and let the game come to him then he can make others better both he and our team will play much better the remainder of the year.
This is Ayo's Achilles, imo. He's a head down player, which often works for him when he plays to his strength (running in the open court). But that over-reliance makes him easy to game plan. He's not a great passer and I think that's a lot to ask for substantial in-season improvement. If Ayo isn't going to improve his half-court offense, then he needs to be a killer in transition and on defense. So far, I haven't seen that killer mentality.

He's better off proving he can be a (slightly undersized) 3-and-D SG and backup CG with the potential to develop more lead ball-handling capability. I just don't see how anybody looks at what he's done early this season as a PG and comes to the conclusion that he can lead an NBA offense anytime soon. A comp he should be shooting for in the short term is Delon Wright.
 
#10
I'm surprised to see that Ayo doesn't dominate or at least beat most P5 guards.
Seems like if he is league destined, that would happen.
But he is still great in transition and a very good player.

What I don't understand is "where is the player who made the US team in high school BASED ON HIS DEFENSE"?
Defense is mostly desire. Where is that?
 
#13
short term is Delon Wright.
Alex Caruso is a current PRO measuring stick for Ayo.

Both same size, same type of player, same instinctual type of play, length is there similiar as well.

I could see Ayo initial ### being similiar to Caruso in the league. Difference is he will be drafted and will have more initial opportunity to perform than Caruso did. Caruso has proved his ability/scoring/etc over a few years.
 
#14
I think Ayo goes, no matter what.
That's what I'm thinking too. This year, even if he's projected as a 2nd rounder, it's in his best interest to declare. If he were to come back for his junior season and not have a stellar year, he likely wouldn't be drafted. His odds of sticking in the league are better drafted vs. undrafted. He's probably going.
 
#15
That's what I'm thinking too. This year, even if he's projected as a 2nd rounder, it's in his best interest to declare. If he were to come back for his junior season and not have a stellar year, he likely wouldn't be drafted. His odds of sticking in the league are better drafted vs. undrafted. He's probably going.
I had very much this same conversation with a fellow alum yesterday.
 
#16
Dallas, Texas
This is Ayo's Achilles, imo. He's a head down player, which often works for him when he plays to his strength (running in the open court). But that over-reliance makes him easy to game plan. He's not a great passer and I think that's a lot to ask for substantial in-season improvement. If Ayo isn't going to improve his half-court offense, then he needs to be a killer in transition and on defense. So far, I haven't seen that killer mentality.

He's better off proving he can be a (slightly undersized) 3-and-D SG and backup CG with the potential to develop more lead ball-handling capability. I just don't see how anybody looks at what he's done early this season as a PG and comes to the conclusion that he can lead an NBA offense anytime soon. A comp he should be shooting for in the short term is Delon Wright.
If Ayo could be 1/20th of the player Delon Wright is he would be leading the Illini in scoring
 
#17
The Eternal Optimist
Denver, CO
I am beginning to be a little more nervous that we may only have Kofi for one year. I sure hope we get two, but he sure looks solid against some very good talent early in the season. Well done tonight to the team! We needed this one!
 
#23
I think he has quickly become our #1 NBA prospect.
Agreed. I think most evaluators misjudged his mobility, shot blocking, and rebounding. I thought we were getting a project. If that was the case, this project is way ahead of schedule. He obviously has a NBA body. (NBA scouts can just ask Lewis Garrison if he needs more time in the weight room...) He literally seems to improve every game.
I was really excited to pencil him in the starting 5 for the next few years, but his potential is impossible to hide. If he had a jumper, he’d be a lottery pick this year.
If the staff hasn’t been thinking of how to potentially replace him for 2020, they may be miscalculating... I’m happy he is kind of our little secret right now, but he keeps making all kinds of noise. I think NBA scouts are going to fall in love with his potential.
 
#24
Agreed. I think most evaluators misjudged his mobility, shot blocking, and rebounding. I thought we were getting a project. If that was the case, this project is way ahead of schedule. He obviously has a NBA body. (NBA scouts can just ask Lewis Garrison if he needs more time in the weight room...) He literally seems to improve every game.
I was really excited to pencil him in the starting 5 for the next few years, but his potential is impossible to hide. If he had a jumper, he’d be a lottery pick this year.
If the staff hasn’t been thinking of how to potentially replace him for 2020, they may be miscalculating... I’m happy he is kind of our little secret right now, but he keeps making all kinds of noise. I think NBA scouts are going to fall in love with his potential.
I underestimated it too. I thought that once he started facing legitimately good opponents with size, that he'd struggle....and he still might. It's a long season. Still 21 of these these regular season games to go.

If he can develop a 15-17 foot jumper....he's a lottery pick. I say that because the true center is no longer in the NBA. All of these guys can take their game out to the perimeter. I also wonder about his ability to guard an NBA 5.

It'll be interesting. Glad we have the problem.
 
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