Big Ten Tournament Canceled

#76
Baltimore, MD
So live your life in fear then.
You do realize there are a lot of steps between not attending a Rays game (which IMO was more just a friendly jab/joke at Rays fans) and "cowering in your bedroom". There's a lot more impact to this than death numbers. Lost productivity across all business sectors when people are either sick or quarantined and loss in profits for nearly all major corporations. You've already seen what it's done to the stock market. There's less confidence in markets and there's going to be a downturn in consumer spending. Tourism markets are going to suffer this summer if this thing sticks around. Certain business sectors (tourism, food service, etc) will probably see large amounts of job loss. I think the NCAA has to do what's best because if even one student athlete was to contract the coronavirus and pass away (maybe an unknown medical condition) then it's a horrible look for the NCAA and this is the safest way to play it. Not to mention the NBA and NHL have both suspended their seasons.
 
#78
Forgottonia
This is true on its face, but think of what the tournament actually is: almost a month of college basketball programs traveling around the country. Even if the arenas are sparsely crowded, what are they doing in a city that isn't home? Going to restaurants, staying in hotels, etc. If they planned to go back to campus in the interim, many are shifting to online only or are straight up closing for the time being.

This is all leading to the central issue of what would happen if a player or coach was diagnosed - the answer to which is that the team would be quarantined, unable to participate, and the fairness and integrity of the tournament itself would be called into question. That's not some crazy scenario, I would argue that is probably an even-odds outcome right now. Canceling the tournament midway through after jeopardizing student athletes is a pretty bad result for the NCAA.
I’d say it’s a likely outcome that someone, somewhere would show symptoms before the tourney is over. Many are saying there are asymptomatic people walking around right now, which seems likely to me. No way it doesn’t continue to spread. The tourney will be cancelled. Thank goodness we have much to look forward to next year. Feel bad for the players and team, but it’s a sacrifice that has to be made.
 
#79
Chicago, IL
Alright so to the people who believe this is an overreaction. The idea is to reduce the speed of the spread so that our healthcare system can actually treat the patients that need it. If you allow the virus to spread unimpeded it will inarguably lead to triaging (aka deciding which patients live and die which Italy is already having to do). #FlattenTheCurve
Doesn't this make the case for a near-mandatory quarantine? I'm still going to work. I'm still going to the grocery store. I'm still picking my kid up from school. So what is the difference if I'm in the grocery store with 100 people or in a restaurant with 100 people or on a soccer field with 100 people? I'm actually asking, I don't understand how those could be different. To me it is kind of all or nothing.
 
#80
St. Peters MO
Wondering if there is anything like a catastrophic insurance....
 
#81
Orange Krush Class of 2013
Stanford, CA
Doesn't this make the case for a near-mandatory quarantine? I'm still going to work. I'm still going to the grocery store. I'm still picking my kid up from school. So what is the difference if I'm in the grocery store with 100 people or in a restaurant with 100 people or on a soccer field with 100 people? I'm actually asking, I don't understand how those could be different. To me it is kind of all or nothing.
Each additional measure helps flatten the curve a bit more. If you only go to the grocery store, that's 100 people instead of 300. Take that across the whole population, and it still lowers the peak caseload towards what we can handle. Then on the flip side of the coin, cutting a basketball tournament or closing a restaurant is less disruptive than closing a grocery store, so it makes sense to start with the more easily dispensable things.
 
#82
South Carolina
Doesn't this make the case for a near-mandatory quarantine? I'm still going to work. I'm still going to the grocery store. I'm still picking my kid up from school. So what is the difference if I'm in the grocery store with 100 people or in a restaurant with 100 people or on a soccer field with 100 people? I'm actually asking, I don't understand how those could be different. To me it is kind of all or nothing.
I don't think it's all or nothing because 100% containment is not the goal
 
#83
Chicago, IL
Each additional measure helps flatten the curve a bit more. If you only go to the grocery store, that's 100 people instead of 300. Take that across the whole population, and it still lowers the peak caseload towards what we can handle. Then on the flip side of the coin, cutting a basketball tournament or closing a restaurant is less disruptive than closing a grocery store, so it makes sense to start with the more easily dispensable things.
Didn't mean to imply they shouldn't have cancelled the tournament. But if I go to the grocery store and then to go work, I'm interacting with another person who went to a restaurant and then came to work, so I'm exposed to all of those people at the restaurant even if I didn't go there. I'm no infectious disease specialist, it just comes off to me like the response has been a whole spectrum of drastic measures to nothing at all. It leaves people confused.
 
#86
Admin
Just got a call from a Kansas official. Their statement has been misinterpreted. Kansas has NOT pulled out of NCAA Tournament. Key word: Cancelled travel, events "indefinitely."
https://twitter.com/dennisdoddcbs/

Report: Decision on March Madness to be made on Friday
“Top NCAA officials are meeting most of the day Thursday to decide the future of the 2020 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament amid growing concerns over the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, a high-level NCAA source told CBS Sports' Dennis Dodd. Though a decision could be shared with the public at any point, the current expectation is that an official announcement won't be made until Friday.”
https://247sports.com/college/kansas-state/Article/March-Madness-coronavirus-update-144948383/
 
#91
New York
So this a larger question in general, but what's the plan for all of this? "Lockdown" for four weeks to prevent hospital systems from going over capacity, let everyone back out for four weeks, "lockdown" again and keep repeating?

Because if that's the case then we are in store for a very messed up prolonged period of time.

Or do we say to hell with it, let nature run its course, and just go with it as best as we can as a society?
I think the idea is that people are going to catch it even with some lockdown measures in place but the spread will be slower, allowing hospitals to keep pace. My best guess is that we have certain forms of lockdown for a while, probably a couple months of major events being canceled, school and work shutdowns in localized areas where there are confirmed cases, etc.
 
#93
Don't get your hopes up.

I highly recommend Joe Rogan's podcast. It's long...but the absolute best info I've heard or read since this started.

It's going to get worse....and it's not just hysteria....it's an actual expert telling you.

actually listened to that this morning on my way to work. Found it very informative. Especially the other crap that is going on
 
Likes: Ramrod2010
#95
So this a larger question in general, but what's the plan for all of this? "Lockdown" for four weeks to prevent hospital systems from going over capacity, let everyone back out for four weeks, "lockdown" again and keep repeating?

Because if that's the case then we are in store for a very messed up prolonged period of time.

Or do we say to hell with it, let nature run its course, and just go with it as best as we can as a society?
The to hell with it scenario overwhelms the hospitals in the short term, and would likely result in more overall deaths.

The scenario with isolation and as much quarantine as possible prolongs the total time of the virus in society, but keeps the peak of infection manageable for hospitals.
 
#99
Sporting arenas are far, far more densely populated than grocery stores. I'm no chonk but it was asses to elbows in the SFC Sunday night.