Chicago White Sox 2019

Iowa City
Here’s your lineup: Madrigal, Anderson, Moncada, Abreu, Encarnacion, Jimenez, Robert, Grandal, Mazara. THAT is a murderers row. Quite literally, you have a hard time finding a place to put Grandal, a 70 million dollar stud. I CANNOT WAIT!!!
When they first traded for Mazara, I wasn't sold and thought he clearly needed adjustments to improve to what scouts thought he could be coming up. Now with how the lineup shakes out, even if he doesn't improve, you are going to get 25/70 from a hitter in the bottom third of the lineup. That will be huge.
 
Likes: Joel Goodson
Here’s your lineup: Madrigal, Anderson, Moncada, Abreu, Encarnacion, Jimenez, Robert, Grandal, Mazara. THAT is a murderers row. Quite literally, you have a hard time finding a place to put Grandal, a 70 million dollar stud. I CANNOT WAIT!!!
Is this lineup in your projected order? Anderson should be bottom 3rd, and Robert should be top 3rd. Of course, Renteria is the manager so the lineup will probably make no sense and Robert will be bunting.

I'd go:

Robert
Moncada
Abreu
Encarnacion
Grandal
Jimenez
Anderson
Mazara
Madrigal
 
Los Angeles
Of course, Renteria is the manager so the lineup will probably make no sense and Robert will be bunting.
LOL
Man, I hope he gets better this year. This lineup is kind of a tricky one too. Only thing I'm sure about is Yoan 2nd.
 
The Villages, FL
Is this lineup in your projected order? Anderson should be bottom 3rd, and Robert should be top 3rd. Of course, Renteria is the manager so the lineup will probably make no sense and Robert will be bunting.

I'd go:

Robert
Moncada
Abreu
Encarnacion
Grandal
Jimenez
Anderson
Mazara
Madrigal
You can't put the American League batting champion at the bottom of the order. That's a given. The lineup order IS a tough job. That's what gives me so much optimism. Everyone can play, everyone can hit. I do agree that Madrigal will be near the bottom at first, but after he acclimates, he needs to be near the top. He's going to have one of the highest, if not THE highest, on-base percentage. Nice problem to have...
 
Los Angeles
You can't put the American League batting champion at the bottom of the order. That's a given.
Not sure that's a given. Tim had over 150 PAs at 6/7 spot last year and absolutely murdered. Just keep him out from behind slow runners so you don't handcuff his ability to take an extra base.
 
Iowa City
You can't put the American League batting champion at the bottom of the order. That's a given. The lineup order IS a tough job. That's what gives me so much optimism. Everyone can play, everyone can hit. I do agree that Madrigal will be near the bottom at first, but after he acclimates, he needs to be near the top. He's going to have one of the highest, if not THE highest, on-base percentage. Nice problem to have...
The batting title was great for a down year, but TA needs to walk more before I trust his ability to consistently have a high OBP. I'm not sure I want TA in the top half the order. He doesn't walk enough to lead off. I'd rather have Yoan in the 2 spot, and I want the 3-5 slots to be more power/run producers. I like TA in the 6/7 spot with Mazara behind him to drive him in.
 
You can't put the American League batting champion at the bottom of the order. That's a given. The lineup order IS a tough job. That's what gives me so much optimism. Everyone can play, everyone can hit. I do agree that Madrigal will be near the bottom at first, but after he acclimates, he needs to be near the top. He's going to have one of the highest, if not THE highest, on-base percentage. Nice problem to have...
To agree with the others, I don't put any stock in batting average. By itself, it's basically a useless stat. You might be a very good player, but it's not because you won the batting title, especially if it's a bunch of singles.
 
The Villages, FL
To agree with the others, I don't put any stock in batting average. By itself, it's basically a useless stat. You might be a very good player, but it's not because you won the batting title, especially if it's a bunch of singles.
I understand not putting a great emphasis on batting average, but to say you put No stock in it goes too far. When a guy hits .335 and has decent doubles and home run production, he's a player. Anderson was definitely NOT just a singles hitter.
 
I understand not putting a great emphasis on batting average, but to say you put No stock in it goes too far. When a guy hits .335 and has decent doubles and home run production, he's a player. Anderson was definitely NOT just a singles hitter.
No he wasn't, but what you just described is slugging percentage, where you give weight to doubles, triples, and HRs. That's why I'm an OPS guy (SLG + OBP).
 
I understand not putting a great emphasis on batting average, but to say you put No stock in it goes too far...
No it doesn't.

Hanser Alberto (Baltimore) had 160 hits in 524 ABs last year for a .305 average.
Austin Meadows (TB) had 154 hits in 530 ABs last year for a .291 average.

What does betting average tell you about the relative quality of these two hitters' performance last year? Nothing. Based on batting average, you might think that the two players were relatively similar batters. Far from the truth.

Batting average doesn't tell you that Meadows had 7 more doubles, 5 more triples, 21 more home runs, and 38 more walks last year than Alberto did.

Thus, absent other information, batting average is essentially meaningless. Now, if I tell you Alberto and Meadows had about the same number of at bats, but that Meadows had a .922 OPS while Alberto had a .751 OPS, you know pretty much all you need to know about the relative quality of the two hitters' performances. You can be a mediocre .300 hitter like Alberto and you can be a great .250 hitter like Josh Donaldson, for example.
 
you feel me, dog?
Elmhurst
No it doesn't.

Hanser Alberto (Baltimore) had 160 hits in 524 ABs last year for a .305 average.
Austin Meadows (TB) had 154 hits in 530 ABs last year for a .291 average.

What does betting average tell you about the relative quality of these two hitters' performance last year? Nothing. Based on batting average, you might think that the two players were relatively similar batters. Far from the truth.

Batting average doesn't tell you that Meadows had 7 more doubles, 5 more triples, 21 more home runs, and 38 more walks last year than Alberto did.

Thus, absent other information, batting average is essentially meaningless. Now, if I tell you Alberto and Meadows had about the same number of at bats, but that Meadows had a .922 OPS while Alberto had a .751 OPS, you know pretty much all you need to know about the relative quality of the two hitters' performances. You can be a mediocre .300 hitter like Alberto and you can be a great .250 hitter like Josh Donaldson, for example.
VG analysis. Batting average seems akin to plus/minus in hockey: pretty much meaningless by itself.

Been out of the baseball loop forever, but this may be the year I start paying attention again. Knock on wood.
 
Likes: ILL_INI