Coronavirus Pandemic

The university is not asking people to protest. It's not a university sanctioned event. while I agree with the notion that people should be wearing masks and be socially distant (not to mention peaceful), if COVID spreads due to those protests, the university is not liable.
Please look at the list from the Universtiy of guidelines, and then look at the article in which 2 students were suspended.


Not to digress, but I find that argument that this is beyond health/safety a bit amusing.
My argument on health & safety was in an earlier post about CTE.
 
st petersburg, fl
I understand where you are coming from IlliniBrave. I do. It's a tricky situation for sure, and one that I don't think any of us are happy to be in.
I agree. If those students so desire, I'm sure they can take the university to court regarding this, and would likely have a strong case.

More broadly, there's very rarely is there to be a right or wrong answer about this. in this country, a situation where many people have to make a small sacrifice to benefit a few people has historically been very difficult to sustain. while clearly not the same, there are parallels to this and the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare). That legislation was also clearly an effort to have many people pay a little to benefit a few people (i.e. the ~20% or so of the US population without health insurance). Obviously that had its political differences too. This is essentially the same thing but the few that are being helped are being helped with their lives (though i'd argue the cost of wearing a mask is minuscule to a vast majority of people, so the argument against wearing one baffles me). With the individualistic principles this country has been built on (and i'm not saying that's a bad thing), these types of situations will always be difficult.
 
I love football as much as the next guy (used to be a season ticket holder...my kids and their activities take priority now). Let's not kid ourselves that the health and safety of the athletes/staff is the sole reason for the football season to be postponed. I don't care what side of the aisle you are on, there are politics behind this decision. We know much more about CTE then we know about Covid-19, and there are a large number of studies that show that people who play football are a a much greater risk for CTE. How many conferences and universities have decided to shut down there program because of the risk to the athletes?
Quite simply, the info is out there on CTE - as you say - very much is known. If players understand that and continue to play - that is their decision. The difference is that they can not pass that CTE on to me, my family, or other individuals via normal casual contact. There are fewer and fewer kids playing football because of this issue. I would guess that long term, unless they get even more strict about the rules, the sport may not survive.
 
uh, Maine
Good article on the differences in the various tests that are being used. Does anyone have data on the number of cycles that the UI test uses? I'd be interested to know what the likelihood is of false positives from the test.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/29/health/coronavirus-testing.html
It's a shame that we don't have a better approach to testing than the haphazard approach the US has taken (not sure how the rest of the world tackles it). How can we make any sense of the results if these tests are all based on different systems/assumptions? :doh:
 
Likes: dbeaverfg
Cary, IL
It's too bad a small amount of U of I students decided they should continue partying after receiving positive test results resulting in a lockdown for U of I. C'mon. You can't wait a couple weeks in quarantine?

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/10/health/university-illinois-covid.html
Carl T. Bergstrom, a professor of biology at the University of Washington in Seattle and an infectious disease expert, said most of the other large state universities were “opening and hoping for the best without doing any kind of serious testing or they’ve switched to largely online education.”

What the University of Illinois has tried to do is “pretty unusual,” Dr. Bergstrom said. “Being able to have an in-person semester at a school of that size with that kind of social atmosphere is really a remarkable accomplishment and I think they have a reasonable chance of pulling it off,” he said. “If it if it doesn’t work, they gave it a damn good try.”

It is good to see that the university is getting positive recognition. The 7 day positivity rate is back down to .9% through 9/8.
 
Thanks for the article. Good find.

We are in a really tricky spot because we didn't hold out quite long enough in lockdown so some good news is welcome.

It is very frustrating when the rest of the conference is all over the place. If all schools tested as much as us I don't think anyone would be playing. There has got to be schools out there that have to cancel because they can't budget in tests. If we say the Big Ten can't be like that, then I'm not sure we can treat the athletes like amateurs.
 
NW Suburbs
It's a shame that we don't have a better approach to testing than the haphazard approach the US has taken (not sure how the rest of the world tackles it). How can we make any sense of the results if these tests are all based on different systems/assumptions? :doh:
Exactly!! How can everyone not see that comparing apples to oranges will never result in useful conclusions.
 
Likes: MainelyIllini
st petersburg, fl
Please look at the list from the Universtiy of guidelines, and then look at the article in which 2 students were suspended.




My argument on health & safety was in an earlier post about CTE.
On your first point - I responded around the same time you posted this, so won’t rehash that.
On the second point - I’m pretty sure you weren’t talking about CTE in the below quote

“ but I don't think we should be kidding ourselves that this is all about health and safety! A large number of students...”
 
The Transfer Portal
Football - as an activity in a vacuum - doesn't seem especially risky. It's college that presents higher risk - for many reasons, including:

- college students are, for COVID purposes, adults; seems like they get it and pass it on as much as anyone else does (i.e. there's no benefit like we see as age goes down in younger school attendees)
- college students are coming from various places and mixing together, and frequently (as opposed to high school/grades school communities, where you're essentially drawing on one geographic area and these students are under parental supervision)
- University administrators and the NCAA have pretty significant incentives against taking a "bubble" approach with athletes, or doing anything differently than they do with the rest of the student body

These are the things that make college sports the most tangled knot (without even touching on additional items like the age of faculty or fans at college events vs. pro or HS ones). Aside from the fact that you have some really large people (OL/DL) who might have some added risk, football itself is, like IlliniBrave is suggesting (I think?) just one of many activities that can occur in a campus environment.
 
For those asking, here's the quote I'm referencing, which cited the Tuscaloosa Times for the data. Yes, it was a low test day, but if students are in town, why would there be any low test days...are they resting from contact tracing?!

In addition, since the last time the numbers were adjusted, there have been no motions that even suggest that government, state or federal, is taking more effective action. Instead, business restrictions continued to be lifted, mobility levels continue to increase, and “mask use continues to decline.” On top of everything else, testing rates have plummeted. That rate of new cases is hugely deceptive, because some states are testing at rates that are fractions of where they were at peak, and even smaller fractions of where they should be. Thirteen states had double-digit rates of positive tests. That includes a 20% rate in both Dakotas, and a staggering 90% positive rate for tests in Alabama. Alabama, it appears, has stopped testing anyone except the people who already clearly have COVID-19.
 
Likes: KevinC
Here's another juicy quote, from SI:
Fifteen SEC and Big 12 college towns have “uncontrollable” COVID levels. Yet, they plan to host as many as 25,000 fans for a game.
Those economies are going to be hurt a lot worse and a lot longer than the schools who actively seek to maximize social distancing. Let's keep wearing masks!
 
For those asking, here's the quote I'm referencing, which cited the Tuscaloosa Times for the data. Yes, it was a low test day, but if students are in town, why would there be any low test days...are they resting from contact tracing?!
can you post an actual link to that article?
 
Okay, without going too far down a rabbit hole with COVID here (sorry, but it's relevant!)...

... if there IS a vaccine and ~150 million or more have been vaccinated by about January or February (some optimistic estimates have been in this range), what do you think the odds are we could actually ATTEND an Illini NCAA Tournament game in March? PERSONALLY, I think at that point it is entirely fair to start doing such things and advising people to be weary of the fact that the disease is still out there, but I could see the NCAA/colleges just wanting to wait, too.

I just want to see this Illini team in person so badly. :p
 
Likes: krushdad
There are two covid vaccines on schedule to seek FDA approval next month, numerous more by the end of the year, and even more by February.

I put the likelihood we don't have a vaccine by March at under 1%.

We don't need no stinking bubbles.
 
Likes: IlliniGrad93
There are two covid vaccines on schedule to seek FDA approval next month, numerous more by the end of the year, and even more by February.

I put the likelihood we don't have a vaccine by March at under 1%.

We don't need no stinking bubbles.
'having' a vaccine (assuming that it is in fact effective) and distributing it to the population and getting the population to actually take it (twice, as seems to be the necessity for vaccines being tested currently) are entirely different matters... as Fauci just said yesterday, even if a vacine is approved by early next year, it will be the end of the year before life would return to something approaching our former lives (e.g. large crowds gathered in the same place)
 
Likes: IlliniKat91
So we’re about a month into kids back on campuses, and while I read alarmist stories several weeks ago about hundreds, and in some cases thousands, of positive tests, I have not read about any influx of hospitalizations among students or university employees. Obviously it is great news if hospitalizations aren’t happening - anyone seen data on this? Has a single student or staffer in the U of Illinois (or, let’s say Alabama) community been hospitalized since classes resumed?
 
So we’re about a month into kids back on campuses, and while I read alarmist stories several weeks ago about hundreds, and in some cases thousands, of positive tests, I have not read about any influx of hospitalizations among students or university employees. Obviously it is great news if hospitalizations aren’t happening - anyone seen data on this? Has a single student or staffer in the U of Illinois (or, let’s say Alabama) community been hospitalized since classes resumed?
Are they “alarmist stories”about positive tests if they’re true stories about tests?