FBI College Basketball Corruption Investigation

#1
It has been one year since the news broke and the six schools directly impacted seem to be thriving just fine, thank you very much. Just thought maybe this should be revived although I suppose there isn't much more to be said. I seem to remember that I didn't think much would come of this investigation (and posted same) although I have not been following it assiduously as perhaps some of my Loyalty brethren and sistren (?) have. But is it still too early to say? Your opinion counts!

https://www.sbnation.com/college-ba...very-school-recruiting-louisville-usc-arizona
 
#2
The NCAA has no power to damage a program with a built-up infrastructure of fans and facilities and success.

Now, Auburn and USC are probably more like SMU Football circa 1986 than Louisville is, and when it's a house of cards the NCAA really can push it over.

We'll see. We all know the Pearl thing is only gonna end one way.
 
#9
Proof that crime does, in fact, pay. Why follow the rules when there is no fear of repercussions?
Don't forget that the NCAA is probably the best criminal in the bunch. Although I have to admit, the colleges individually are getting good at thumbing their noses at the governing body for some of the worst over-reaches.
 
#11
Proof that crime does, in fact, pay. Why follow the rules when there is no fear of repercussions?
Probably a whole nother discussion, but I think we see this everywhere in society, not just schools dealing with the NCAA. If it's a minor penalty under normal circumstances, programs try to comply. If it's a major penalty, or there's a lot at stake (say Urban Meyer's employment), they fight and often reach a settlement that both sides can live with.

As an analogy, take Elon Musk's tweet about taking Tesla private. He clearly violated the law on manipulating stock prices, but rather than go to jail as he should, he's being sued by the SEC, which may or may not be a deterrent, depending on whether they go after him personally, or as an officer of Tesla. We'll see.

Point being that the penalty to the individual is what matters. Handcuffs and prison sentences are generally a good deterrent, which is why the financial crisis of 08 is likely to repeat IMHO (no fraud by the investment bankers was ever prosecuted)...and healthcare will continue to be unaffordable (price fixing)...and superfund environmental disasters where everyone knows the danger will continue....and on and on. Companies routinely violate the law, and if you don't go after the individuals, well, deterrence doesn't work. Why? Because lawsuits that settle against a company are generally defended by the company (thus individuals are largely protected legally and financially). So why care? Especially when you get more benefit than the penalty adjusted for the risk of being caught. Just a cost of doing business.

Back to the topic and analogy with the NCAA, we're in the mode of lawsuits and settlements, which have only the slightest deterrent affect, and on a PR basis, we're all having scandal fatigue because the behavior is happening constantly. So there's little cost, and lots of benefit.

I'll yield the soapbox now....
 
#12
Probably a whole nother discussion, but I think we see this everywhere in society, not just schools dealing with the NCAA. If it's a minor penalty under normal circumstances, programs try to comply. If it's a major penalty, or there's a lot at stake (say Urban Meyer's employment), they fight and often reach a settlement that both sides can live with.

As an analogy, take Elon Musk's tweet about taking Tesla private. He clearly violated the law on manipulating stock prices, but rather than go to jail as he should, he's being sued by the SEC, which may or may not be a deterrent, depending on whether they go after him personally, or as an officer of Tesla. We'll see.

Point being that the penalty to the individual is what matters. Handcuffs and prison sentences are generally a good deterrent, which is why the financial crisis of 08 is likely to repeat IMHO (no fraud by the investment bankers was ever prosecuted)...and healthcare will continue to be unaffordable (price fixing)...and superfund environmental disasters where everyone knows the danger will continue....and on and on. Companies routinely violate the law, and if you don't go after the individuals, well, deterrence doesn't work. Why? Because lawsuits that settle against a company are generally defended by the company (thus individuals are largely protected legally and financially). So why care? Especially when you get more benefit than the penalty adjusted for the risk of being caught. Just a cost of doing business.

Back to the topic and analogy with the NCAA, we're in the mode of lawsuits and settlements, which have only the slightest deterrent affect, and on a PR basis, we're all having scandal fatigue because the behavior is happening constantly. So there's little cost, and lots of benefit.

I'll yield the soapbox now....
I would like to subscribe to your newsletter.
 
Likes: illinifan4249
#13
Probably a whole nother discussion, but I think we see this everywhere in society, not just schools dealing with the NCAA. If it's a minor penalty under normal circumstances, programs try to comply. If it's a major penalty, or there's a lot at stake (say Urban Meyer's employment), they fight and often reach a settlement that both sides can live with.

As an analogy, take Elon Musk's tweet about taking Tesla private. He clearly violated the law on manipulating stock prices, but rather than go to jail as he should, he's being sued by the SEC, which may or may not be a deterrent, depending on whether they go after him personally, or as an officer of Tesla. We'll see.

Point being that the penalty to the individual is what matters. Handcuffs and prison sentences are generally a good deterrent, which is why the financial crisis of 08 is likely to repeat IMHO (no fraud by the investment bankers was ever prosecuted)...and healthcare will continue to be unaffordable (price fixing)...and superfund environmental disasters where everyone knows the danger will continue....and on and on. Companies routinely violate the law, and if you don't go after the individuals, well, deterrence doesn't work. Why? Because lawsuits that settle against a company are generally defended by the company (thus individuals are largely protected legally and financially). So why care? Especially when you get more benefit than the penalty adjusted for the risk of being caught. Just a cost of doing business.

Back to the topic and analogy with the NCAA, we're in the mode of lawsuits and settlements, which have only the slightest deterrent affect, and on a PR basis, we're all having scandal fatigue because the behavior is happening constantly. So there's little cost, and lots of benefit.

I'll yield the soapbox now....
Good soapbox!
 
#15
Ollie getting "show caused", funny some of the infractions are for failure to promote an atmosphere of compliance as well as failure to monitor outside workouts...even though UNC received nothing as many others did as well for what would seem to be as much if not harsher penalties/infractions. NCAA....Not Charging Anyone Again...what a joke.

http://www.espn.com/mens-college-ba...evin-ollie-hit-ethics-charge-faces-show-cause
Roy is on record as saying, he was the basketball coach, and left the academic standing, and ability to maintain eligibility to others. He good.:giggle:
 
#16
Mayhap I spoke too soon (referring to my comment about how nothing will come of this all).

"What to know as first trial in college hoops recruiting scandal begins"

From the article: “Over the course of these three trials, you’re going to see major programs get touched by this, and the nature of how business is done is going to be exposed,” an unidentified source with knowledge of the investigation told Yahoo Sports."

http://www.sportingnews.com/us/ncaa...w-york-fbi-cheating/cthnykcypxiy16g5j5jhl25tq
 
#17
Wilmette, IL
Roy is on record as saying, he was the basketball coach, and left the academic standing, and ability to maintain eligibility to others. He good.:giggle:
"I'm the Head Basketball Coach, not the Don't Take Payments From Boosters Coach, or the Don't Take The Widely Known Sham Classes To Remain Eligible Coach! I mean, I can only do so much!"
 
#18
http://www.espn.com/mens-college-ba...ncaa-hoops-scandal-likely-spread-trial-starts

Some interesting takeaways:

"Multiple people involved in the federal investigation have told ESPN in recent months that the FBI advised NCAA officials to stand down until the criminal trials are over. " which would explain why we haven't seen anything happen yet on the NCAA side.

"...the NCAA could accept evidence and findings from the federal government's investigation and punish those found guilty of wrongdoing -- without conducting its own investigation. "

"In court documents filed last month in former Louisville coach Rick Pitino's lawsuit against the university, the school's attorneys alleged that Pitino ignored red flags after hearing allegations that DePaul had offered Bowen $200,000 to play there. The court filing included a text message that Pitino is said to have sent to then-Cardinals assistant Kenny Johnson on June 2, 2017, saying: "Coach DePaul trying to pay Bowen 200 k to come there. Crazy world!" "

DePaul could get sucked into this. Weird. So, we could see lots of movement from this. I'm definitely not holding my breath though...
 
#19
Stylin' and Profilin'
I'm curious how the money is handled. $200k? That's slightly over the $15k gift limit. Do schools assign advisers to these recruits on how to launder money? Crazy world, indeed -
 
#20
Little Rock, Arkansas
Apparently Oregon just got pulled into this trying to get Bowen maybe? Offered him a ton of cash. Maybe they can go down in flames and Okoro will want to come back home??

Can’t find link but just read it on my yahoo sports app so it’s probably on yahoo sports.
 
#21
#22
The most interesting article to me. http://www.espn.com/mens-college-ba...atch-college-hoops-biggest-scandal-goes-trial
About half way down, GATTO, and KANSAS. I read they gave Dollar Bill's, and Townsend's names to prospective jurors to make sure they didn't have a personal connection. Hmm, don't think they would do that for expert testimony. Time will tell. A few years ago the relationship between the Adidas Pump Brothers getting Kansas tournament tickets to sell was out there. This has been going on for decades.