FBI College Basketball Corruption Investigation

Wilmette, IL
I'm anticipating the NCAA allegations/investigations showing that Kansas had major violations, and then ruling that if even a school like Kansas occasionally runs afoul of the rules, then the rules must be at fault. Then they'll change the payment-to-athletes rules, and clear Kansas of any wrongdoing.
 
So, considering how the NCAA works, the six would be: Kansas City Community College, Illinois, The Women's College of the University of Denver, Illinois, Cal Poly (just recently put on probation) and because it has the name Illinois in it, Illinois Institute of Technology
That moment when typing "ILL" into the article's search bar:


Later on when "ILL" becomes "LouisvILLe"

 
So, considering how the NCAA works, the six would be: Kansas City Community College, Illinois, The Women's College of the University of Denver, Illinois, Cal Poly (just recently put on probation) and because it has the name Illinois in it, Illinois Institute of Technology
Luke Ford sits another year and loses a year of eligibility. Deon Thomas is taken off the radio. Tom Izzo to be brought in to give victim sensitivity training. Rick Pitino to give advice on respecting women. Roy Williams on academic integrity. Bruce Pearl on owning your mistakes and learning from them.
 
I wonder how people will react if OSU gets a major and Underwood skates.
I can't speak for anyone else but I for one would be relieved. :usa:
That's a good answer. I didn't pay much attention to the final on Evan's charges, but the initial bit of taking bribes to steer players to an agent seems a lot different than working with shoe companies to pay players to come to your school. In the former, that doesn't seem like something you would share with your boss or want your boss anywhere near; the latter the boss has something to gain in better players/better program/ advancing the bosses career as well and I have a hard time thinking any head coach is so clueless to not know what it takes to get various recruits. So just by the nature of the beast, it has always seemed unlikely that any head coach goes down on the assistant bribery charges since the benefactor is only the assistant lining his pockets.
 
Edit: IMO for this whole comment...

I’ve posted about this more in depth before, but the NCAA’s primary objective is to maintain the amateurism status quo. That’s why they won’t punish a winning program. They can’t, by their own admission, allow the argument that compensating players beyond the allowances of amateurism contributes to winning.

If amateurism ends, so does the NCAA; at least the NCAA that makes money. The NCAA will not allow their own actions support the argument that players are compensated beyond the rules, those payments are made in the best interest of the schools, and lead to a competitive and financial benefit for the school.

That’s why when it becomes too obvious, and they’re forced to act, the NCAA pins it on a parent. If the student athletes benefits directly it undermines their amateurism argument.
 
Likes: CoalCity
Well, Carter and Williamson, (or parents) have been mentioned as receiving monies, so how will dooke fair?
 
It's obvious the NCAA doesn't want to do their job, too much money at stake. Something i find bothersome if i think about it, because i would like to see a level playing field for all schools. But since i like college football and bb i go along with the charade each year. The corrupt NCAA are the one who should be investigated and given the death penalty.
 
The NCAA have and will continue to punish the "low hanging fruit". Anything that calls out UNC, Duke, Kansas, Louisville or Kentucky (well maybe not
them since their coach has been punished, or at least his former teams, so many times I wonder how he's still coaching) will never be punished beyond
a wrist slap. They are the golden children of the cash cow that is the NCAA. Just another reason for the power five to eliminate their relationship, pay
their kids a reasonable stipend as a minor league to the pros and reap the financial benefits in BB and FB.
 
Likes: Pop'sBlackDog
It's funny they are legitimate issues but not significant issues compared to what is brought out in FBI investigations at other schools
So the 200 head coaches is just a large exaggeration or you think over half of the coaches operate much beyond this level of violations? The FBI investigation has targeted how many 8 or 12 schools? Sorry haven't kept up too close.
 
So the 200 head coaches is just a large exaggeration or you think over half of the coaches operate much beyond this level of violations? The FBI investigation has targeted how many 8 or 12 schools? Sorry haven't kept up too close.
I think team mgrs and team video guys tracking and "overly helping players" and team getting better is minor stuff...but featured in this article. Honestly,..
I'm don't know why those are even violations. Almost like the police know there are robberies all over town, but they are laser focused on catching guys for speeding tickets.

JMO but I think the bigger issue is the insider trading arrangements that I believe are common place between shoe reps, AAU coaches and successful NCAA school recruiters. I think the 8 or 12 that come out in NCAA's response to the FBI sting are relatively small sample size of a "gray area" culture that has evolved from the "good old days" of watching HS tournaments and selling your program to parents, players and HS coaches.,...boy don't we know for most top recruits , those days are long gone.

Side note,,,, I think that is some of the beauty of recruiting overseas...less handlers and influencers to negotiate with.
 
The reason (and I'm going off my own common sense here, so...) these things need to have defined rules and time limits is because they could and would be abused. Coaches might not make it mandatory to attend scrimmages with student managers/ video guys, but might heavily insinuate that those who do go have a greater chance at getting PT. Or maybe they just flat out say this is how this team gets better, go to the scrimmages or else.

I can't say I advocate tightening the grip on these kind of activities, but I also don't know if completely removing them is the right call. In these instances I think it levels the playing field and doesn't force kids into doing excessive amounts of practice.

Now, as for the NCAA coming down on coaches and programs for this, I agree with previous posts. There are clearly much bigger fish to fry here, but it's also obvious the NCAA reaches for the low hanging fruit every time.
 
That's a good answer. I didn't pay much attention to the final on Evan's charges, but the initial bit of taking bribes to steer players to an agent seems a lot different than working with shoe companies to pay players to come to your school. In the former, that doesn't seem like something you would share with your boss or want your boss anywhere near; the latter the boss has something to gain in better players/better program/ advancing the bosses career as well and I have a hard time thinking any head coach is so clueless to not know what it takes to get various recruits. So just by the nature of the beast, it has always seemed unlikely that any head coach goes down on the assistant bribery charges since the benefactor is only the assistant lining his pockets.
I read the indictment against Evans. It said specifically that assistants like Evans and the others they indicted, wanted head coaches to know absolutely nothing about their scheme to push players after college to a certain agent, so it's not just the common sense you spoke about. This is where the FBI's investigation led them.
 
I read the indictment against Evans. It said specifically that assistants like Evans and the others they indicted, wanted head coaches to know absolutely nothing about their scheme to push players after college to a certain agent, so it's not just the common sense you spoke about. This is where the FBI's investigation led them.
Wow, better than I hoped for. That would seem to clear Underwood on the Evan’s front. Now, unfortunately if you have a guy taking money from an agent to steer players, then there is probably a better chance he is doing something else illegal and more investigation around your program that could have collateral damage... but the overall statement that he tried to keep it from Underwood and the program is very good