FBI College Basketball Corruption Investigation

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#27
Jeff Borzello Tweet:

Brian Bowen Sr. told the jury today that Christian Dawkins conveyed the following offers for Brian Bowen Jr. to commit:
• Arizona: $50,000
• Oklahoma State: $150,000, $8000 for a car, money for a house
• Texas: “help me with housing”
• Creighton: $100,000 and a “good job”
 
#29
M tipping over
Pdx
I don't know what is more depressing, that all this happened right under BU's nose or that OSU had to overbid so much because they were so bad at recruiting, yet still lost the recruit. :LOL:
You literally couldn't pay me to move to Stillwater, so I get the decision.
 
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#33
Bonnaroo Land
Ford was a great recruiter there, and seemed to have his pickens.
 
#36
It seems to me the Illini fan base is underestimating the risk we have at this point.
Nah... Illinois has really no exposure/risk on this as an institution. BU runs the risk of the investigation uncovering possible knowledge or involvement, but all this happened while OSU. Even in worst case scenario, where FBI (and later NCAA) impose penalties on BU (and that is a huge IF right now as Underwood has not been implicated), those penalties will not involve UI. It would obviously affect his employment at UI, but nothing beyond that as a school.
 
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#38
It seems to me the Illini fan base is underestimating the risk we have at this point.
Potential exposure to the irrational decisions of a body whose process I don't understand, based upon things that I cannot affect.
It is hard to get too interested at this point.
 
#39
The NCAA has no power to damage a program with a built-up infrastructure of fans and facilities and success.

Now, Auburn and USC are probably more like SMU Football circa 1986 than Louisville is, and when it's a house of cards the NCAA really can push it over.

We'll see. We all know the Pearl thing is only gonna end one way.
I am pretty sure that I have read that there is a new rule since the 'commission' a few months ago. If the infraction has been determined in a court of law, then the NCAA doesn't even need to investigate. That source, a legal determinant, will suffice as evidence.
Gee, that great recruiter Bill Self may have had a lil help. Lmao
 
#40
Mad Scientist
Arizona, USA
At this point, it's pretty clear this is going to touch the vast majority of programs in some way. This likely ends in a way where they try to fix the underlying issue and don't sanction 2/3 of their member institutions. Maybe a few of the biggest offenders who aren't blue bloods get slapped, but probably most walk away unscathed.
 
#41
At this point, it's pretty clear this is going to touch the vast majority of programs in some way. This likely ends in a way where they try to fix the underlying issue and don't sanction 2/3 of their member institutions. Maybe a few of the biggest offenders who aren't blue bloods get slapped, but probably most walk away unscathed.
Then the NCAA will have NO credibility at all to the fans. I think they will have to act, because of public opinion. They didn't want to know, but now the world knows.
 
#42
What the article doesn't say is this type of "recruiting" has been going on since "hector was a pup"! And it's not the dark underbelly of college basketball as described by someone. This corruption of college bb has been a bright shining light for all to see. Except the corrupt NCAA an organization that insults everyone's intelligence with the we hold our institutions to highest standards embarrassing rhetoric. It's enough to make me stop watching when i actually think about all the corruption involved.
 
#43
Then the NCAA will have NO credibility at all to the fans. I think they will have to act, because of public opinion. They didn't want to know, but now the world knows.
Meh... the NCAA doesn't have any credibility to begin with, yet fans and sponsors flock in record numbers reaching record revenue in college basketball. In reality, nobody wants anything to happen other than some overzealous fans on message boards who want to see their rival schools penalized but not their own.

They will go after the individuals involved (coaches, agents, and shoe execs) and schools will walk free with very minor penalties if at all.
 
#44
Mad Scientist
Arizona, USA
Then the NCAA will have NO credibility at all to the fans. I think they will have to act, because of public opinion. They didn't want to know, but now the world knows.
They already have no credibility. They'd have even less if 2/3 of their programs are on probation with a postseason ban. There probably won't be many viewers for an NCAA Tournament with top seeds of St. John's, Holy Cross, St. Bonaventure, and Marist. Money dictates this won't happen.

The smart move is to admit the problem was caused by conditions they created, fix the problem, and move on with relatively little formal punishment. In the meantime, they should let the criminal aspects of it play out and be handled by the justice department.
 
#46
Michigan
At this point, it's pretty clear this is going to touch the vast majority of programs in some way. This likely ends in a way where they try to fix the underlying issue and don't sanction 2/3 of their member institutions. Maybe a few of the biggest offenders who aren't blue bloods get slapped, but probably most walk away unscathed.
BWAHAHAHA!!!
 
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#48
Mad Scientist
Arizona, USA
BWAHAHAHA!!!
I said try, not succeed. Their ultimate goal will be to try to clean up whatever part of this they can without driving away fan interest and dollars. They've already taken some steps, albeit dubious, by changing recruiting rules.

Ultimately, though, it's the one-and-done rule and/or amateurism rules that need to change to make a real dent in this. If the kids who are already good enough to get paid are allowed to get paid, either by pro clubs or by profiting off their own names and likenesses, then you have less need for the bags of cash approach to recruiting. It would still exist, but drastically reduced, IMO. Replace illicit payments with totally allowed payments, in essence.
 
#49
Or why Snider jumped ship on signing day.... :unsure:
As good as Snider was, he was not that good coming out of HS to command cash payments. He was a local kid who always wanted to go to Louisville but got the cold shoulder when Louisville opted for higher options who were actually more likely to have demanded extra benefits (JaQuan Lyle). Once that fell through and an open scholarship was created, Snider's move to Louisville was more of a weasel Pitino move than anything else.
 
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