Heat Wave 2012

#3
Southeast IL
it sucks. when I went thursday to run some errands, my car had been in the partially enclosed carport, so obviously in the shade. the temp gauge on my car said it was 104. told my wife it was 104 IN THE SHADE. :eek:
 
#6
Middletown, IL
I haven't even been out in the heat too much and I have heat rash on my chest and upper back. Happened when I got out of the shower yesterday (took a nice warm shower...I always take a warm shower in any weather...Makes me feel relaxed)
 
#8
103 in Champaign today, and humid to boot. Mercy!

I like the heat, generally. This is a bit too much.
 
#9
I can't wait til next week. This heat is doing quite a number on my business. +100 degree heat for the last 10 days and no rain in over 6 weeks is really draining me physically and mentally.
 
#10
Savoy, IL
I can't wait til next week. This heat is doing quite a number on my business. +100 degree heat for the last 10 days and no rain in over 6 weeks is really draining me physically and mentally.
15 degrees cooler next week, but not much shot for significant rain as the front passes. Then it's at least another week until our next shot for rain. Corn crop in southern IL is ruined, and I fear that ours will be ruined in another week up here.
 
#11
Evansville, IN
15 degrees cooler next week, but not much shot for significant rain as the front passes. Then it's at least another week until our next shot for rain. Corn crop in southern IL is ruined, and I fear that ours will be ruined in another week up here.
Lordy loo it is bad down here.

The SW side still has a puncher's chance, but in the SE, another two weeks without some real rain (not just a 30-min downpour that rolls off into the creeks) will finish off the few patches still clinging to their open greenness.
 
#12
15 degrees cooler next week, but not much shot for significant rain as the front passes. Then it's at least another week until our next shot for rain. Corn crop in southern IL is ruined, and I fear that ours will be ruined in another week up here.
I'm not quite as concerned about the lack of rain as I am the heat. I can at least water to keep things looking decent. Not many people want to golf when it has been this hot. But yeah the farmers around here are going to have to collect insurance checks around here instead of crops. Not good for them. But they have had a helluva good run these past few years. I believe the insurance pays 80% of the average yield of the last 5 years. If corn and bean prices are up then they still might be able to take their 6 week vacation to Florida again this year. ;)
 
#13
Savoy, IL
Lordy loo it is bad down here.

The SW side still has a puncher's chance, but in the SE, another two weeks without some real rain (not just a 30-min downpour that rolls off into the creeks) will finish off the few patches still clinging to their open greenness.
Yeah, we were down visiting friends south of Olney last weekend, that corn is done. Some are already mowing it off from what I understand. Not quite that bad here yet, but another week or two with no rain will finish it off.

I'm not quite as concerned about the lack of rain as I am the heat. I can at least water to keep things looking decent. Not many people want to golf when it has been this hot. But yeah the farmers around here are going to have to collect insurance checks around here instead of crops. Not good for them. But they have had a helluva good run these past few years. I believe the insurance pays 80% of the average yield of the last 5 years. If corn and bean prices are up then they still might be able to take their 6 week vacation to Florida again this year. ;)
Yeah I'm generally the same as you. I can handle dry most of the time, but I can't do the heat. Not for 10 days in a row anyway.
 
#14
SouthEastern Illinois
Yeah, we were down visiting friends south of Olney last weekend, that corn is done. Some are already mowing it off from what I understand. Not quite that bad here yet, but another week or two with no rain will finish it off.



Yeah I'm generally the same as you. I can handle dry most of the time, but I can't do the heat. Not for 10 days in a row anyway.
I live in Southern Wayne County, near where you were visiting. Everything here is torched, some people received some rain last week, but we never had a drop! We have broken the temp records almost every day. Most were set in the 1930's, preceding the Dusty Bowl years, That would be devastating to the Midwest. I don't know if the corn is even suitable for silage. Its Chief Illiniwek, the gods are angry because he isn't allowed to dance at halftime.
 
#15
Illini Family Farm
The Heartland
I'm not quite as concerned about the lack of rain as I am the heat. I can at least water to keep things looking decent. Not many people want to golf when it has been this hot. But yeah the farmers around here are going to have to collect insurance checks around here instead of crops. Not good for them. But they have had a helluva good run these past few years. I believe the insurance pays 80% of the average yield of the last 5 years. If corn and bean prices are up then they still might be able to take their 6 week vacation to Florida again this year. ;)
I'll probably have to miss my 6 weeks this year. Livestock won't be able to make the trip with me.;)

Just a fyi for anyone who is interested. This link will take you to the UofI Farmdoc website which is an amazing source of information that's not just for farmers.

My only real point was to let you know that the crop insurance most farmers buy is a revenue product that uses price times yield to determine a $/acre level of coverage. You then choose what percentage of that you will insure. Obviously the higher coverage you purchase, the more it costs. Most farmers are in the 70 - 80% range as you say. But most won't benefit from higher prices because the amount of their coverage is already determined.

The details get quite tedious to explain and I'm sure no one wants to know that much anyway, but just thought I would throw that out there. The link above goes into great detail.

Insurance or not, to watch the crop you put your heart and soul into wither and die is devastating. My crops are hurting, but nothing like southern Illinois has seen.
 
#16
I'll probably have to miss my 6 weeks this year. Livestock won't be able to make the trip with me.;)

Just a fyi for anyone who is interested. This link will take you to the UofI Farmdoc website which is an amazing source of information that's not just for farmers.

My only real point was to let you know that the crop insurance most farmers buy is a revenue product that uses price times yield to determine a $/acre level of coverage. You then choose what percentage of that you will insure. Obviously the higher coverage you purchase, the more it costs. Most farmers are in the 70 - 80% range as you say. But most won't benefit from higher prices because the amount of their coverage is already determined.

The details get quite tedious to explain and I'm sure no one wants to know that much anyway, but just thought I would throw that out there. The link above goes into great detail.

Insurance or not, to watch the crop you put your heart and soul into wither and die is devastating. My crops are hurting, but nothing like southern Illinois has seen.
Thanks for the link. I hope you weren't offended by my Florida wise crack. I have several farmer friends and I am always giving them grief how "easy" they have it. All joking aside, it hasn't been a very good year for you guys. Perhaps just 2 weeks down south? ;)