Illini at Soldier Field Chicago: 2015, 2017, 2019 games vs Northwestern

They do sleep at a hotel before the games. Still, it may not seem like a huge effect, but it does seem that all of these advantages added up is a very possible reason for the around 3 point home field advantage studies have found. This is all getting away from my main point which is the crowd is not the main reason for the home field advantage. In fact the size of the crowd probably has very little effect.
So why do home teams win most of the time? One explanation may be that, for whatever reasons, performing in front of a friendly crowd tends to kick home team players’ hormonal systems into high gear...

Part of the explanation, Jamieson says, may be that playing in front of an unfriendly crowd can cause subtle but possibly significant degradation of the complex skills that athletes have developed through extensive practice. It’s not the distractions, necessarily, but the crowd’s jeering when a player makes a mistake...

There’s also evidence that officials are influenced psychologically by the home crowd’s emotional response to plays.

http://news.discovery.com/human/why-does-home-field-advantage-matter-131004.htm
 
Still, it may not seem like a huge effect, but it does seem that all of these advantages added up is a very possible reason for the around 3 point home field advantage studies have found.
i get your point, and there is certainly some truth to it, but remember that ~3 points is the average

including games like ILL @ ASU, or PAC teams playing at noon on the east coast, anyone at Hawaii, as examples

i am willing to bet quite a bit that the actual homefield advantage for ILL, while playing NU, which is traveling just a couple hours, on chartered buses, with no time change, in a near empty stadium contributes much less than the average point differential


so anyway, i bet the tradeoff is more like 1-1.5 points for that extra cash/publicity/recruiting, and even that might be overstating it

someone could probably do a regression analysis to find a more accurate number, if they were so inclined, given the volume of games between the 2 schools over the years
 
interesting question.
I'm betting it is in Chicago.
If the DIA wants to back up the "every game in Illinois is a home game" stuff, then it has to be.
oh man, that would be a pretty sweet moment to look forward to: senior day/night in soldier field, good chance in your home town or at least in the stadium where the team you grew up rooting for plays, and if not, still in the 3rd largest city/media market in the country, against your hated in-state rivals

sign me up for that
 
i get your point, and there is certainly some truth to it, but remember that ~3 points is the average

including games like ILL @ ASU, or PAC teams playing at noon on the east coast, anyone at Hawaii, as examples

i am willing to bet quite a bit that the actual homefield advantage for ILL, while playing NU, which is traveling just a couple hours, on chartered buses, with no time change, in a near empty stadium contributes much less than the average point differential

so anyway, i bet the tradeoff is more like 1-1.5 points for that extra cash/publicity/recruiting, and even that might be overstating it

someone could probably do a regression analysis to find a more accurate number, if they were so inclined, given the volume of games between the 2 schools over the years
I agree.

1) Memorial stadium - empty
2) Soldier Field, 2 hour bus ride, majority Illinois crowd

If we had the data to run a model, I would guess that on average we are giving up less than a point.
 
This doesn't really prove your point though. You are not proving that we lose home advantage because we have less attendance. This article also does not connect the actual win percentage connection from the crowd. It is just explaining psychology of the athlete. The point is not that crowd has no effect whatsoever, but that actual noise from the attendance is not the reason for the advantage. Both Kenpom and Bill Connelly at Study Hall were unable to find a link from big crowds to improved performance to the point where they would have a statistically significant advantage compared to a small crowd. I guess the question is do you feel Vegas would give the same home advantage for Illinois at Soldier Field as they would in Champaign?

http://kenpom.com/blog/index.php/weblog/entry/rabid_crowd_theory

http://www.footballstudyhall.com/2011/8/3/2341564/the-toolbox-home-field-revisited
 
This doesn't really prove your point though. You are not proving that we lose home advantage because we have less attendance. This article also does not connect the actual win percentage connection from the crowd. It is just explaining psychology of the athlete. The point is not that crowd has no effect whatsoever, but that actual noise from the attendance is not the reason for the advantage. Both Kenpom and Bill Connelly at Study Hall were unable to find a link from big crowds to improved performance to the point where they would have a statistically significant advantage compared to a small crowd. I guess the question is do you feel Vegas would give the same home advantage for Illinois at Soldier Field as they would in Champaign?

http://kenpom.com/blog/index.php/weblog/entry/rabid_crowd_theory

http://www.footballstudyhall.com/2011/8/3/2341564/the-toolbox-home-field-revisited
Kenpom only looks at the average attendance for the conference. But schools playing in smaller arenas with rapid fans can be as much more more intimidating as bigger schools playing in larger arenas. ANd even still, there was as statistically significant effect of crowd size. What the research shows is that multiple factors contribute to the home field advantage, and any one factor is only a partial contributor. So a short bus ride to a stadium where Illinois fans are the majority would only have a partial loss of home field advantage.

Sure, it has some impact, since there is a general trend for the conferences with the more avid following to be near the top. But the fact that it took five years of data to uncover a weak trend, and that there isn't much consistency for a given conference from year-to-year*, tells me that factors that affect basketball as a whole (travel, change in routine, etc.) have more impact than factors specific to any conference (size/intensity of crowds, or "dominant courts").
The football study hall doesn't provide enough detail on how they did their analysis for me to make a meaningful comment. We are probably better off sticking to the peer-reviewed literature.
 
I think you are a little too stuck on the travel. The travel is of course not the only factor and may not even be the most significant. The point is that our crowd difference from thanksgiving to non-thanksgiving weekends is not worth any significant margin. By the way my claim is I have yet to see significant proof in the difference in attendance being worth a competitive advantage compared to the actual home advantage we know exists. The burden should be on you to prove that the difference in the crowd is worth a competitive advantage greater than the home field that exists for any team no matter the atmosphere, no?
 
I think you are a little too stuck on the travel. The travel is of course not the only factor and may not even be the most significant. The point is that our crowd difference from thanksgiving to non-thanksgiving weekends is not worth any significant margin. By the way my claim is I have yet to see significant proof in the difference in attendance being worth a competitive advantage compared to the actual home advantage we know exists. The burden should be on you to prove that the difference in the crowd is worth a competitive advantage greater than the home field that exists for any team no matter the atmosphere, no?
No, I'm too stuck on multiple factors contributing to home field advantage, and only a few being a significant factor in this case.

I never made any claims about a bigger crowd being an advantage. Rather, there isn't anything lost from a crowd perspective in moving from Memorial Stadium to Soldier Field.
 
Just got my tickets flying from AZ to go to this game I am super excited. It's going to be great to be back in Chicago!
 
Woodridge, IL
So can we cancel this?
I'd rather not. At least at Soldier Field there is no dedicated student section that can be mocked when there's barely anyone in it. Saturday after Thanksgiving games are just rough, there were a lot of places with empty seats this weekend.
 
Yonkers, NY
I don't think 40k empty seats at Soldier Field is helping our brand. If we are going to have that many people not showing up I'd rather have it happen in Champaign rather than on display in Chicago. If we are going to give up a home game there should be a clear benefit.
 
I don't think 40k empty seats at Soldier Field is helping our brand. If we are going to have that many people not showing up I'd rather have it happen in Champaign rather than on display in Chicago. If we are going to give up a home game there should be a clear benefit.
Not hurting our brand like endless Deadspin/SB Nation mockery of us being unable to fill seats in CU. At least in SF, Northwestern gets a little embarrassment not having a bigger showing considering it's basically at home for them. Doesn't really move the needle brand-wise either way for us or NW. Better than being in CU.
 
Yonkers, NY
Not hurting our brand like endless Deadspin/SB Nation mockery of us being unable to fill seats in CU. At least in SF, Northwestern gets a little embarrassment not having a bigger showing considering it's basically at home for them. Doesn't really move the needle brand-wise either way for us or NW. Better than being in CU.
So the benefit for giving up a home game is that it also kind of makes NU look bad?
 
Yonkers, NY
If that's all we are getting out of it I'd rather the NU players not having the luxury of sleeping in their own beds the night before.

I think we should revisit this idea when we have our !!!! together but until then.
 
Soldier Fiekd flat out sucks as a venue for a game vs NW ... NW has a terrible fan base ... They are a 10-2 team playing 10 min from campus 2 days after T-giving in a huge metro area and there were only 30k in attendance. That's a shame.

Too bad Wrigley wasn't able to be a doable place for the game on a fairly regular basis. The atmosphere was fantastic in 2010 and it has the perfect seating cap for the series.
 
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Western Suburbs
I was dead set against the Soldier Field game in lieu of a true home game, to the point where I received a month suspension from this site.
Since I live in the western suburbs of Chicago, let me give you a different perspective of why I like the last game in Chicago. I have four season tickets to the football games but the year before last, I did not use any of them for the game in Champaign after Thanksgiving. I did attend all the Illini home games this year but if they had played the last game in Champaign this year, I would not have driven 2.5 hours each way to attend the game. However, since the game was in Chicago, I took the train downtown and walked to Soldier Field to see the game. I also bought tickets for a former football season ticket holder and 2 of his friends. We had a great tailgate and I think that they enjoyed the game.

The game mistakes the Illini made were not the result of not playing in Champaign but have been nagging problems this entire year.
 
Mascoutah, IL
I totally get that Konnie, and for the most part my perspective is a selfish one. I live near STL and drive up for the games, so moving it further to Chicago is not "conducive" for me.

I get the need for Chicago to be behind IL athletics, I just take it somewhat personal and feel sometimes it's in spite of central/southern IL fans. Like our fanhood is being taken for granted (which seems to be a recurring theme for all fans this year), while U of I grovels at the feet of Chicago fans.

From a brand and marketing perspective I truly get it, and hopefully it will eventually pay dividends.
 
I totally get that Konnie, and for the most part my perspective is a selfish one. I live near STL and drive up for the games, so moving it further to Chicago is not "conducive" for me.

I get the need for Chicago to be behind IL athletics, I just take it somewhat personal and feel sometimes it's in spite of central/southern IL fans. Like our fanhood is being taken for granted (which seems to be a recurring theme for all fans this year), while U of I grovels at the feet of Chicago fans.

From a brand and marketing perspective I truly get it, and hopefully it will eventually pay dividends.
This is certainly a recurring issue, but hey, at least now they've evened it up by taking ALL of our fandom for granted :thumb:
 
A Legend in My Own Mind
Montgomery, IL
I totally get that Konnie, and for the most part my perspective is a selfish one. I live near STL and drive up for the games, so moving it further to Chicago is not "conducive" for me.

I get the need for Chicago to be behind IL athletics, I just take it somewhat personal and feel sometimes it's in spite of central/southern IL fans. Like our fanhood is being taken for granted (which seems to be a recurring theme for all fans this year), while U of I grovels at the feet of Chicago fans.

From a brand and marketing perspective I truly get it, and hopefully it will eventually pay dividends.
How is this any different than when we played Missouri year after year in STL? Don't you think the Chicago fans had similar issues back then?
 
Mascoutah, IL
How is this any different than when we played Missouri year after year in STL? Don't you think the Chicago fans had similar issues back then?
It isn't different, and don't you remember all the griping about a "neutral" game closer to Mizzou. Most everyone I recall wanted a true home/home. That was also during the reign of us only having 6 home games, which was lame.

I wasn't a huge fan of the STL game either. Funny enough living ~ 30 minutes away, I only attended 1 of those, yet made it up to the majority of games in CU.