Illini Football & CFB Thread

Status
Not open for further replies.
#76
I'm a political moderate and I tend to sit on the fence with regard to the NCAA playing football this fall. At the same time, I don't really want the Illini (and Big 10) to get left out of the party if everyone else plays and participates. As such, I've spent the last hour catching up on college football news over the past 48 hours, including the pending Big 10 vote by the Presidents/Chancellors. It was very interesting reading. In all that I saw and read, the sentence below was the ONE thing that bothered me......

"If massive outbreaks happen, and other conferences shut down their season, no worries. Shelve any “fall” plans and go back the winter plan."

Really? NO WORRIES? I don't think we can say NO WORRIES after watching what happened in metro NYC and various other hot spots this past spring. I believe the university decision makers are trying to keep things safe for their students and faculty, and don't want to walk into a hornets nest and be responsible for loss of life and/or severe illness. I trust their judgement, regardless of how the Big 10 votes.
No worries towards executing a “fall ball” plan.

Not no worries that “outbreaks happened” and the potential damage that could ensue.
 
#78
^ Good. While I do support playing and think the data back up playing as more than safe enough, I would expect/hope that Illinois does what the Conference decides. IMO, we have the basketball clout again to aggressively push for playing even if the votes weren’t there ... in football, I’d think we’d be in the “trust and support the league’s decision, regardless” camp, haha.
 
Likes: pvaughn8
#79
West Coast
I think the big ten should throw an Oct/Nov date out there to show we're "in the game"...it will still give us flexibility to pull the plug if the earlier experiments all go sour.

Unfortunately the current national sentiment aligns with Jason Gay's WSJ article:

...after crawling out of the no-sports desert of the spring and early summer, but here goes:
There are too many sports right now.
Yeah. I said it.
.....
it seems like every league on earth is playing—except for, you know, the Big Ten.
 
#80
Cary, IL
I think the big ten should throw an Oct/Nov date out there to show we're "in the game"...it will still give us flexibility to pull the plug if the earlier experiments all go sour.

Unfortunately the current national sentiment aligns with Jason Gay's WSJ article:
Out of curiosity, why is the Pac10 immune (pardon the pun)? Is the Pac10 that insignificant in football?
 
#84
South Carolina
#85
I really hope we play. I genuinely believe that it is safe "enough" (as in, nothing is COMPLETELY "safe" right now if your attitude is that new positive cases in anything past tiny numbers is unacceptable) to play, I really feel for the kids and every athletic program at every one of these schools really needs the revenue. Additionally, from a solely selfish perspective, I worry about how gloomy fall and winter are going to get if Illinois shuts restaurants down again, and I would at least like to be able to watch the Illini on Saturdays with a few friends. :p

It sounds like the strategy they laid forward is more pleasing to the decision makers, regardless of how much of this is damage control or politics or completely financially motivated. And that isn't anything but good news, no matter which way you leaned.
 
#88
I don't find this surprising --BIG just needed cover, and I think they've done that with the delays:
* protocols have been set up and used at other schools with some success
* national trend of lower new daily cases has been going on for over a month
* a number of studies are suggesting the fatality rate has lowered as more becomes known
* while there are clearly questions about long-term health for certain patients, the docs and lawyers must think that risk is manageable
* money and the demand for college football is high despite the spread

It won't be business as usual, but it's a huge step in that direction. Frankly, I think a huge swath of the population has resigned themselves to 'it is what it is' and still wants to see them play.
 
#89
I don't find this surprising --BIG just needed cover, and I think they've done that with the delays:
* protocols have been set up and used at other schools with some success
* national trend of lower new daily cases has been going on for over a month
* a number of studies are suggesting the fatality rate has lowered as more becomes known
* while there are clearly questions about long-term health for certain patients, the docs and lawyers must think that risk is manageable
* money and the demand for college football is high despite the spread

It won't be business as usual, but it's a huge step in that direction. Frankly, I think a huge swath of the population has resigned themselves to 'it is what it is' and still wants to see them play.
I agree. We seem to be semi-effectively "managing" the virus, even though risks do persist. And........

Those who desire to opt out can indeed opt out.
 
#90
BU:1 Trash cans:0
Chicago
Regardless of the final outcome, we are seeing Ryan Day's criticism play out in real time. The conference is failing to deliver clear and uniform communication to players, schools, and the public. And in the absence of strong leadership, we are being left to sift through a morass of information leaks, unidentified sources, and questionable rumors. The current situation is not inspiring confidence in me.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.