Illinois 69, Nebraska 57 POSTGAME

#55
Kirksville, MO
My personal all-time list of irreplaceable Illini seniors:
Rayvonte Rice
Dee Brown
Lucas Johnson
Damir Krupalija
Sergio McClain
Deon Thomas
Kenny Battle
 
#56
My personal all-time list of irreplaceable Illini seniors:
Rayvonte Rice
Dee Brown
Lucas Johnson
Damir Krupalija
Sergio McClain
Deon Thomas
Kenny Battle
Gotta add Augustine, Paul and DJ to that list
 
#57
Is there a video of the Senior Night stuff before the game anywhere? I missed it when the Michigan State-Purdue game went long.
 
#62
I'm going to miss Egwu next year. By all accounts he's the perfect teammate and he's probably my favorite center in UI history. I don't know if he can make the NBA next year, but there's no doubt that if he wants to, he can play pro ball for a looong time.

Also, can you imagine if Egwu and Black had one more year together? We'd probably have the toughest 4/5 combo in the big ten.
 
#63
Seeing Colbert hug Egwu at the end of the game got me thinking:

Even if Egwu's skillsets never quite developed as much as we had all hoped, how invaluable is his attitude/effort/work ethic on culture of the program? How much better do you think Colbert's college career will be because he had Nanna as an example and spent 2 years under his wing? That's the type of stuff that makes a winning program, and is what will make me miss Nanna so much.

Fingers crossed Colbert really pops next year and continues to set a positive example for future Illini. Beat Purdue!
 
#64
We Ready
Merced CA
Seeing Colbert hug Egwu at the end of the game got me thinking:

Even if Egwu's skillsets never quite developed as much as we had all hoped, how invaluable is his attitude/effort/work ethic on culture of the program? How much better do you think Colbert's college career will be because he had Nanna as an example and spent 2 years under his wing? That's the type of stuff that makes a winning program, and is what will make me miss Nanna so much.

Fingers crossed Colbert really pops next year and continues to set a positive example for future Illini. Beat Purdue!
POTD!
 
#65
Orange Crush '89
Northern Illinois
GAH I CAN'T TAKE THE MOVING SCREENS EVERY GAME, AAAAAHHH!!!! DRIVES ME NUTS!


Whew. I feel better. Gutty win, love watching the seniors on Senior day. They're all family. Love those guys.
 
#66
GAH I CAN'T TAKE THE MOVING SCREENS EVERY GAME, AAAAAHHH!!!! DRIVES ME NUTS!


Whew. I feel better. Gutty win, love watching the seniors on Senior day. They're all family. Love those guys.
I also do not understand why so many players (not only Illini) cannot grasp the idea that a pick is stationary. It is the responsibility of the man with the ball to run his man into the pick. If the guy with the ball is pushed away from the pick you cannot slide over. I wince every time I see Illinois do it. I feel we are fortunate that it is not called more often.

If I were coaching any moving pick whether called or not would win an automatic 2 minutes on the bench. A team cannot go into the end of the season still doing this.
 
#67
Kirksville, MO
I also do not understand why so many players (not only Illini) cannot grasp the idea that a pick is stationary. It is the responsibility of the man with the ball to run his man into the pick. If the guy with the ball is pushed away from the pick you cannot slide over. I wince every time I see Illinois do it. I feel we are fortunate that it is not called more often.

If I were coaching any moving pick whether called or not would win an automatic 2 minutes on the bench. A team cannot go into the end of the season still doing this.
I'm starting to believe that players are coached to set screens that way -- as close as you can get to moving without it being blatantly obvious.
 
#68
New York
I'm starting to believe that players are coached to set screens that way -- as close as you can get to moving without it being blatantly obvious.
Is there really an advantage to doing it that way? IMO our movement isn't actually helping us at all. If Nnanna were standing there stationary, it's easier for the ballhandler to go past Nnanna shoulder to shoulder and take his guy directly into Nnanna. The way Nnanna moves when he screens isn't generally to plow the guy over (which would get called very very often if he actually made real contact with the defender and was moving), he's just as often starting to slip out of the screen and move toward the basket.

Not only are the screens illegal, they're ineffective. I just don't understand how the coaches would want this. If it were just Nnanna, ok, but it's a problem with multiple bigs. I just don't get it. Again - goes to the question of whether we have an effective big man coach, but this is so fundamental and involves guards that any coach should be able to teach this properly. This ain't teaching post footwork.
 
#69
I believe there were 3 moving screens called on the guys last night. Truth be known, they probably could have called 5 times as many. It just looks ugly out there the way they do it, yet, they continue to get away with it to a certain extent. I don't understand why the screen is such a hard concept for these guys to grasp, not to mention all the other issues seen with this team. Of course, I am sitting in my comfy arm chair and it is easy to be critical. I am just thankful at this point that the Illini seem to be playing better and tournament destiny is still within reach. Small steps for this year might be the best we can expect.
 
#70
Is there really an advantage to doing it that way? IMO our movement isn't actually helping us at all. If Nnanna were standing there stationary, it's easier for the ballhandler to go past Nnanna shoulder to shoulder and take his guy directly into Nnanna. The way Nnanna moves when he screens isn't generally to plow the guy over (which would get called very very often if he actually made real contact with the defender and was moving), he's just as often starting to slip out of the screen and move toward the basket.

Not only are the screens illegal, they're ineffective. I just don't understand how the coaches would want this. If it were just Nnanna, ok, but it's a problem with multiple bigs. I just don't get it. Again - goes to the question of whether we have an effective big man coach, but this is so fundamental and involves guards that any coach should be able to teach this properly. This ain't teaching post footwork.
I agree. I think the high screens on offense and high double teams on defense are just part of the coaching philosophy. Problem is that the bigs are always in motion (i.e., run to set a pick/double team, run back) which puts them in constant movement against opposing players, with many fouls either moving or running late into position. I'm not a fan of the tactic either.
 
#71
I think the high screens on offense and high double teams on defense are just part of the coaching philosophy.
Can someone who knows more about basketball than myself explain the purpose of this? How is the reward of pressuring the ball-handler worth the risk of moving your best rim-protector away from the basket? And of the remaining four players, why have the PG rotate to defend the basket?
 
#72
Can someone who knows more about basketball than myself explain the purpose of this? How is the reward of pressuring the ball-handler worth the risk of moving your best rim-protector away from the basket? And of the remaining four players, why have the PG rotate to defend the basket?
I do not know basketball as well as some know basketball. I know that if my ball handler did not drive right against the guy setting the pick, I had my pick person peel off toward the rim to get a pass, since the driver was not executing correctly. I made sure that there was no reason to leave gaps between the pick and the driver.

It, to me, is never worth a foul on my big, nor a wasted pick. There, to me, is NO point to it. It is just lack of execution. Nothing else. If my pick was not able to poke the driver in the ribs when he went by, it was not close enough.
 
#73
Kirksville, MO
Is there really an advantage to doing it that way? IMO our movement isn't actually helping us at all. If Nnanna were standing there stationary, it's easier for the ballhandler to go past Nnanna shoulder to shoulder and take his guy directly into Nnanna. The way Nnanna moves when he screens isn't generally to plow the guy over (which would get called very very often if he actually made real contact with the defender and was moving), he's just as often starting to slip out of the screen and move toward the basket.

Not only are the screens illegal, they're ineffective. I just don't understand how the coaches would want this. If it were just Nnanna, ok, but it's a problem with multiple bigs. I just don't get it. Again - goes to the question of whether we have an effective big man coach, but this is so fundamental and involves guards that any coach should be able to teach this properly. This ain't teaching post footwork.
I don't know if there's any advantage or not, but taking an extra half-second to plant and stay set for a screen doesn't seem like it would be that hard to do and coach, especially when the trade-off is a bad foul.
It seems like most moving screens could be very easily avoided if that was a point of emphasis, which is why I think that stationary screening isn't what's being taught.
Maybe they are trying to generate a little more impact on the defender in the hope that they'll eventually go a little further out of their way when they see the next one coming. :noidea:
 
#74
Can someone who knows more about basketball than myself explain the purpose of this? How is the reward of pressuring the ball-handler worth the risk of moving your best rim-protector away from the basket? And of the remaining four players, why have the PG rotate to defend the basket?

It's most effective, especially against team like Nebraksa. Their only offense is putting Shields or Petteway in a pick n roll. They don't have anyone else that can beat you. When executed properly, the double team stops penetration and at the same time puts enough pressure on the ball handler to prevent a pass to the open man. If you want to see almost perfect execution of this plan, re watch the Miami tournament game. We played amazing defense against a guy that was nearly unstoppable all season, Larkin. It's a defense that forces others to beat you...Nebraska doesn't have those others.
 
#75
The decision to trap on ball screens makes so much more sense when we have more than one rim protector in the game.

When Hill is playing the 4, we're utterly exposed whenever Egwu gets pulled away from the basket. By contrast, I've really liked how our defense has looked with two out of Colbert, Black, and Egwu in the game at the same time. Colbert and Black aren't big shot blockers, but their length is enough to bother a shooter and they both cover ground very quickly and give up their bodies around the rim.

It's really amazing how much better Colbert is playing now. His rebounding and defense have been great, and he's played within himself and executed on offense. If he can play something like a Sam McLaurin role for us, he'll get plenty of minutes going forward.