Kahlil Whitney leaving Kentucky

Creaning means you don't have a spot. As of today, I think the consensus is that Ayo is gone, Kofi is in play, and there's somewhere north of likely that a player who isn't getting as much PT as he expected will decide to transfer. Even if the staff wanted KW, I wouldn't expect a shortage of schollies.

High majors have to accept the world of college bball recruiting, i.e. transfers, guys getting to the league, etc. This stuff can't play out until after the season's over.
I think the original post was spot on. I hope Illinois is above such tactics. It's not out of the realm of possibility that Illinois would encourage a player to look elsewhere for playing time if a new, shinier prospect showed interest, but I hope not.

Having watched Illinois playing near the bottom of the B1G for a number of years, I have so much respect for players that choose to play for the Illini, believing that they can make a difference. I think Illinois has been blessed with better talent than coaching for awhile (I am starting to believe that Underwood is not part of that group). Illinois should show loyalty to their players.
 
Likes: jmilt7
I think the original post was spot on. I hope Illinois is above such tactics. It's not out of the realm of possibility that Illinois would encourage a player to look elsewhere for playing time if a new, shinier prospect showed interest, but I hope not.

Having watched Illinois playing near the bottom of the B1G for a number of years, I have so much respect for players that choose to play for the Illini, believing that they can make a difference. I think Illinois has been blessed with better talent than coaching for awhile (I am starting to believe that Underwood is not part of that group). Illinois should show loyalty to their players.
I agree
 
You didn't answer the question. The question said today. We have no idea if anyone individual is transferring.
We dont know for sure Ayo is leaving either but odds are that both will happen and the coaches may have a good idea even if we do not. It is very likely that someone that isnt playing wants to or thinks that they should,or are less likely to with new players and will depart. You are correct though we dont know for sure but it is very likely the staff has a really good idea.
As it stands now though i dont think Whitney has anything to do with the Illini and i am not concerned with him other than i hope things work out. I am more curious who is more likely to be an Illini next season and going forward.
 
Last edited:
Likes: Ga65
I think the original post was spot on. I hope Illinois is above such tactics. It's not out of the realm of possibility that Illinois would encourage a player to look elsewhere for playing time if a new, shinier prospect showed interest, but I hope not.

Having watched Illinois playing near the bottom of the B1G for a number of years, I have so much respect for players that choose to play for the Illini, believing that they can make a difference. I think Illinois has been blessed with better talent than coaching for awhile (I am starting to believe that Underwood is not part of that group). Illinois should show loyalty to their players.
Transfers happen to every team, some expected some not expected. Kobe king and Whitney are two unexpected, and now those teams have an unplanned open schollie.
Whitney is best to wait and see until who else transfers after the season, more teams will have openings. Not sure how timing overlaps with nba draft schedule...could be earlier where if he doesn’t like transfer options he can go pro?
 
Is the G League paycheck worth any more than a year of education at UI?
We have had several player from here in Alaska return to play in Australia. I think the season is only something like 32 games and the paychecks given the travel and other expenses is not great ($2,000 per game or less for most players on the team), unless you are the one player usually from American that is paid well. It has been a couple of years since I looked but I think there is a total salary cap of significantly less than $2 million for the entire team (and that may be Australian dollars as well).
If a player's goal is to play professional basketball, then let's be real here, a year of education at UI is worth precisely $0. So yes, a year of G-League is worth more than that.
 
If a player's goal is to play professional basketball, then let's be real here, a year of education at UI is worth precisely $0. So yes, a year of G-League is worth more than that.
College education is worth much more than 4 years in G league
 
Baltimore, MD
College education is worth much more than 4 years in G league
It's really not though, like sacraig said it's worth $0 to guys who are wanting to go pro/do go pro. College is a means to the next step for these guys, most of these Top 100 players don't care about the college education and the top echelon of high school recruits would skip college completely if the rules were different for entering the draft. If you make the NBA you can life the rest of your life doing something else, coach, motivational speaker, local/national ads (depending on how big you were), color commentator, etc. If you can just stay in the league for a few years, that's more than most people make in their entire lives.
 
Last edited:
College education is worth much more than 4 years in G league
Is it really??

I mean, I get it how it can be viewed like that, but let's face it, if your ultimate job doesn't require you to have one, what's the benefit? Put in double work (basketball and schoolwork), make no money, work on your craft part-time, and become a year older. Versus working on your craft full-time, make some money, travel, and squeeze as much time out of this chance to make a living from playing a game? It's an all-in approach, but still...hard to say definitively that a college education is worth more than 4 years in G-league IMO.
 
Is it really??

I mean, I get it how it can be viewed like that, but let's face it, if your ultimate job doesn't require you to have one, what's the benefit? Put in double work (basketball and schoolwork), make no money, work on your craft part-time, and become a year older. Versus working on your craft full-time, make some money, travel, and squeeze as much time out of this chance to make a living from playing a game? It's an all-in approach, but still...hard to say definitively that a college education is worth more than 4 years in G-league IMO.
We live in a world where subsidies and marketing have combined to make an oversupply of college degrees, which in turn lowers wages and increases the requirements for even low level white collar jobs. Having a degree when so many jobs can require it is a great benefit, and gets you past hiring barriers more easily. I strongly suspect the average college student would take an athletic schollie if they could qualify....but then again, they don't have NBA dreams or talent. The bottom line is these athletes have a much quicker timeline for their career, higher risk/reward, and aren't likely to be thinking about what they'll do in their 30s when their athletic careers are winding down. Your point is good *if* the G league is what he needs to make the most of his playing days.

My wild-arse guess is that he goes undrafted and winds up in the G league before heading overseas. If he's just in a mental slump and can actually shoot the ball, then obviously he's going to make serious money.

Makes me wonder if the staff is thinking they dodged a bullet, or he'd be a great get if still available and his deficiencies are fixable.
 
Likes: sacraig
It's really not though, like sacraig said it's worth $0 to guys who are wanting to go pro/do go pro. College is a means to the next step for these guys, most of these Top 100 players don't care about the college education and the top echelon of high school recruits would skip college completely if the rules were different for entering the draft. If you make the NBA you can life the rest of your life doing something else, coach, motivational speaker, local/national ads (depending on how big you were), color commentator, etc. If you can just stay in the league for a few years, that's more than most people make in their entire lives.
He can always go back to college, but the idea that "a few years" in the NBA would be more than most make in their entire lives is wrong. Especially when you consider the high tax rate on large salaries. Luther Head made $7 million in his career as a late first rounder. After taxes and his agent, he walked away with perhaps $3 million. That's a number that is a challenge to match but is clearly matched and exceeded by lots of people in their lifetimes.

If Whitney has a Luther type of career and is wise, he won't need the degree. But when you start getting to the guys steps below Luther it's definitely iffy.
 
Baltimore, MD
He can always go back to college, but the idea that "a few years" in the NBA would be more than most make in their entire lives is wrong. Especially when you consider the high tax rate on large salaries. Luther Head made $7 million in his career as a late first rounder. After taxes and his agent, he walked away with perhaps $3 million. That's a number that is a challenge to match but is clearly matched and exceeded by lots of people in their lifetimes.

If Whitney has a Luther type of career and is wise, he won't need the degree. But when you start getting to the guys steps below Luther it's definitely iffy.
I think $3 million made by "lots of people in their lifetime" is really overestimating the average income that the average American makes. In 2017 the median personal income was $31,000. The average bachelor degree holder makes about twice that ($61,000). So for the average American, looking at mean income, working for 40 years, makes about 1.2 million (not accounting for inflation which I don't think is necessary for my point) in their lifetime and the average bachelor degree holding American working for 40 years earns about 2.4 million in their lifetime, but that's 40 years of work to not touch what Luther made in a decent NBA career (6 years). Think about the communities a lot of these kids grow up in, do you think a lot of these kids grow up in white collar communities where the average household income is 100k+?

The minimum salary in the NBA is about $582,000, which yes, will get taxed at a higher rate, but making that income up front still allows for greater gains if put in a retirement fund (I know, wishful thinking for a 19-23 year old). I understand where you're coming from, but largely, these kids eyeing the NBA aren't interested in the college education. They're looking to be mainstays in the NBA. That's not to say they shouldn't be interested in the degree in case they don't make it in the NBA, but some of the overseas leagues pay more than enough to live a comfortable life and they still get to play a game they love instead of going to a 9 to 5.
 
I think $3 million made by "lots of people in their lifetime" is really overestimating the average income that the average American makes. In 2017 the median personal income was $31,000. The average bachelor degree holder makes about twice that ($61,000). So for the average American, looking at mean income, working for 40 years, makes about 1.2 million (not accounting for inflation which I don't think is necessary for my point) in their lifetime and the average bachelor degree holding American working for 40 years earns about 2.4 million in their lifetime, but that's 40 years of work to not touch what Luther made in a decent NBA career (6 years). Think about the communities a lot of these kids grow up in, do you think a lot of these kids grow up in white collar communities where the average household income is 100k+?

The minimum salary in the NBA is about $582,000, which yes, will get taxed at a higher rate, but making that income up front still allows for greater gains if put in a retirement fund (I know, wishful thinking for a 19-23 year old). I understand where you're coming from, but largely, these kids eyeing the NBA aren't interested in the college education. They're looking to be mainstays in the NBA. That's not to say they shouldn't be interested in the degree in case they don't make it in the NBA, but some of the overseas leagues pay more than enough to live a comfortable life and they still get to play a game they love instead of going to a 9 to 5.
Well, a degree from U of I won't put you in the average category. You're above average. :)

So if you're in the top 25 percentile these numbers look greatly different I imagine. I suppose the original statement about exceeding "most people" is accurate. But I don't think that it's accurate regarding most holders of a U of I degree.

Of course the ideal is to get the degree and play professionally. Then have a solid career to fall back on.

Michael Jordan is a great example. I'm not sure he would be able to survive if he didn't have his meteorology degree to fall back on.
 
Likes: jmilt7
Totally agree with BMore, not to mention that a lot of players have career desires that are all-in on basketball, whether that's playing, coaching, managing, working as/for an agent, broadcasting, etc. Making it to the big leagues helps even if you're the 15th man. You still make tons of connections and gain invaluable experience. There is a limited window in which most players can capitalize on their talents and turn that into beneficial real-life experiences with high-level professional basketball. We would be better off thinking of professional basketball as both a short-term money-making opportunity AND as a trade school that can help one prepare for the next step in their career.

If a college education were truly the primary driver for choosing a place to play college ball, then Harvard and Yale would be fielding a whole helluva lot better teams than they do.
 
It's really not though, like sacraig said it's worth $0 to guys who are wanting to go pro/do go pro. College is a means to the next step for these guys, most of these Top 100 players don't care about the college education and the top echelon of high school recruits would skip college completely if the rules were different for entering the draft. If you make the NBA you can life the rest of your life doing something else, coach, motivational speaker, local/national ads (depending on how big you were), color commentator, etc. If you can just stay in the league for a few years, that's more than most people make in their entire lives.
You are making the massive assumption that someone who is in the G League will make the NBA. Saying a college education is worth $0 is ludicrous, even for someone who wants to pursue the pros. There's a very good chance that a G League guy never makes the NBA. You mention that they could coach when they get done, but not in college without a degree!
 
Totally agree with BMore, not to mention that a lot of players have career desires that are all-in on basketball, whether that's playing, coaching, managing, working as/for an agent, broadcasting, etc. Making it to the big leagues helps even if you're the 15th man. You still make tons of connections and gain invaluable experience. There is a limited window in which most players can capitalize on their talents and turn that into beneficial real-life experiences with high-level professional basketball. We would be better off thinking of professional basketball as both a short-term money-making opportunity AND as a trade school that can help one prepare for the next step in their career.

If a college education were truly the primary driver for choosing a place to play college ball, then Harvard and Yale would be fielding a whole helluva lot better teams than they do.
The Ivy League doesn't give athletic scholarships.
 
Not if you don't use it... or even graduate.
This sounds like the only value of an education is on a job resume. Not in agreement with that but not weighing in on Pro/college.
 
You are making the massive assumption that someone who is in the G League will make the NBA. Saying a college education is worth $0 is ludicrous, even for someone who wants to pursue the pros. There's a very good chance that a G League guy never makes the NBA. You mention that they could coach when they get done, but not in college without a degree!
I don't believe he said "a college education is worth $0". He said "a year of education at UI is worth precisely $0" I don't think U of I has many 1 year degree programs. Starting school is great, but if you don't finish, it isn't worth much. Employers aren't clamoring for people who took a few classes.
 
It's worth pointing out that coaching in high school and college generally requires a degree as well. So the year is worth something if he is getting a degree in the long term. I don't consider his prospects to be all that great professionally, but if he's getting paid any amount and still makes his way to the degree, he'll be fine. And maybe he'll prove me wrong and make the league.
 
I was watching San Diego State the other night when Kawhi was being honored. They stated that when he initially enrolled at San Diego he was a 23% 3 point shooter and today he is a 39% 3 point shooter from the NBA range and improved his shooting while at San Diego and worked his way into the first round. I thought of Whitney when i heard this about Kawhi's history. IMO that is what KW should attempt to dd. It is certainly his choice.Going to the G League is an option but is it the best one for a teen aged kid? If he did transfer in the long run he could do better for himself on both fronts. Either way their is not going to be some easy path to a bunch of money for a 6'6'' wing that struggles to shoot. So many of these young players think they are better than they really are because of weak defenses they have faced and all the the people telling them how great they are. I think working hard and following the path that Kawhi may be the best for him. If he has all this potential then learning how to shoot and develop in college to be a future 1st round pick like Kawhi is what he should do. In the end if he could do the the money would be much better and if not he would have a degree. Plus who knows maybe they will change the sit a year transfer rule i heard last night that is being purposed now by the B10 to the NCAA.
 
Last edited:
The Ivy League doesn't give athletic scholarships.
Touche. Well, another way of putting it would be that Northwestern would dominate the B1G, Vandy the SEC, and Stanford the PAC-12. Last I checked, that ain't happening.

About the only one that bucks the trend is Duke, mostly thanks to one man's brilliance rather than their stellar academics.
 
I was watching San Diego State the other night when Kawhi was being honored. They stated that when he initially enrolled at San Diego he was a 23% 3 point shooter and today he is a 39% 3 point shooter from the NBA range and improved his shooting while at San Diego and worked his way into the first round.
Lol, that is some revisionist history if I've ever heard it. If Kawhi had a legit 3 point shot coming into the draft, he wouldn't have gone 15th. He did improve his 3 point shot in college...from 23% to a whopping 29% his sophomore year.

You can credit Chip Engelland and a whole lot of time spent working on his shot rather than his creative writing for Kawhi's deadly shot these days.
 
Likes: sacraig
Lol, that is some revisionist history if I've ever heard it. If Kawhi had a legit 3 point shot coming into the draft, he wouldn't have gone 15th. He did improve his 3 point shot in college...from 23% to a whopping 29% his sophomore year.

You can credit Chip Engelland and a whole lot of time spent working on his shot rather than his creative writing for Kawhi's deadly shot these days.
I was just stating what Steve Fisher said about his hard work and working his way into the draft at SD St. I feel sorry the kid has to sit a year because he was miss informed or just chose the wrong school. I think the G league does not work out for most 18-19 year old kids even though it can. There is a reason they go there. They are not ready for the NBA yet and usually left too soon if the are 18 or 19. My thoughts are the working in a college atmosphere would be the most productive atmosphere for someone his age to achieve his personal goals. OF course it is his choice and learning from your mistakes is part of life. I hope he makes the right choice.
 
Two points that I think need to be considered in the “value of college” sub-conversation going on here:
  • Times have changed and going back to college when you are in your 30s and 40s is no longer that unusual. Working at a community college, I see tons of highly capable adults who are retraining after an initial 10-20 year career. People aren’t retiring at 55 anymore :)
  • In a profession where your earning ability greatly decreases as you grow just a little older, it makes all the sense in the world to forgo college in order to maximize income in the short-term. The big caveat to that is when the college experience can provide you with better coaching and brand development (free marketing) than you’d otherwise get in a developmental league or overseas.
 
I was just stating what Steve Fisher said about his hard work and working his way into the draft at SD St. I feel sorry the kid has to sit a year because he was miss informed or just chose the wrong school. I think the G league does not work out for most 18-19 year old kids even though it can. There is a reason they go there. They are not ready for the NBA yet and usually left too soon if the are 18 or 19. My thoughts are the working in a college atmosphere would be the most productive atmosphere for someone his age to achieve his personal goals. OF course it is his choice and learning from your mistakes is part of life. I hope he makes the right choice.
I'd argue that in a college atmosphere, they split their time between classwork and basketball. In the G-League, they can dedicate their whole selves to training. Provided they actually do it and have the institutional support from their team that they need, it seems like a no brainier that there is more potential for rapid development in the G-League.

The primary advantage of NCAA ball these days is visibility. No one watches the G-League. Everyone watches NCAA. Building a brand is easier there.