Kahlil Whitney leaving Kentucky

Mad Scientist
Arizona, USA
This sounds like the only value of an education is on a job resume. Not in agreement with that but not weighing in on Pro/college.
I hear you. As a college professor, I'd obviously extol the virtues of a good, well-rounded higher education in producing (hopefully) thoughtful members of society.

That said, it's really easy to go back and finish your degree after cashing some big ol' paychecks from the league. You don't need a college education to inherently understand the idea of taking advantage of your potential when it is peaking.
 
I'd argue that in a college atmosphere, they split their time between classwork and basketball. In the G-League, they can dedicate their whole selves to training. Provided they actually do it and have the institutional support from their team that they need, it seems like a no brainier that there is more potential for rapid development in the G-League.

The primary advantage of NCAA ball these days is visibility. No one watches the G-League. Everyone watches NCAA. Building a brand is easier there.
I agree with this. I think you have a lot more opportunity to develop as a player outside of college. You probably get a bit less "parenting" which no doubt can be a problem.

Raw talent, be it brains or athleticism, is just part of the equation for success. Hopefully KW has some of those other qualities.

I'll also say that while you have more opportunities to practice and develop in a professional setting, there's also not as great of an incentive for teams to work with you rather than pitch you. There's a lot of basketball talent floating around out there. Teams will only put up with so many problems for middling guys.
 
I hear you. As a college professor, I'd obviously extol the virtues of a good, well-rounded higher education in producing (hopefully) thoughtful members of society.

That said, it's really easy to go back and finish your degree after cashing some big ol' paychecks from the league. You don't need a college education to inherently understand the idea of taking advantage of your potential when it is peaking.
Big ole paychecks from the G league???? LOL. No 1st round guarantee, no payday guarantee, no likey. Stay in school and build your brand.
 
Mad Scientist
Arizona, USA
Big ole paychecks from the G league???? LOL. No 1st round guarantee, no payday guarantee, no likey. Stay in school and build your brand.
I didn't (or at least didn't mean to) imply that you are getting giant paychecks from the G-League. I think last I saw they paid something like $35,000 per season. The implicit assumption here is that the student leaves school to do what is best for him and his basketball career (about which there is some debate) and then comes back later after succeeding. Obviously it doesn't work out for everyone, but as with any investment, it's a (hopefully) calculated risk.
 
Likes: BMoreIllini
Baltimore, MD
Big ole paychecks from the G league???? LOL. No 1st round guarantee, no payday guarantee, no likey. Stay in school and build your brand.
Who said G league is the only option? NBA scouts aren't only looking at G League and NCAA games. Sure NCAA and G League gets more visibility (NCAA much, much more so, but I think that's mostly from a fans perspective, scouts will find you if you've got the skill), but other overseas professional basketball leagues pay really well for an 18-22 year old. RJ Hampton, who famously skipped college to go play in the NBL (AU/NZ pro league) makes $100,000+ according to this article. Lamelo Ball makes a similar amount in the NBL from what I read. I don't see why KW couldn't do something similar. Why waste a year because of archaic NCAA transfer rules when you can go cash in on your talents, as well as showcase them for the NBA scouts.

In the Next Stars program like RJ Hampton and Lamelo are in, the players also get an apartment, vehicle, and other perks. Here's some text from a site describing the program:

What is the Next Stars program?
Overseas elite prospects who spend one year in the NBL instead of US college, typically bound for NBA. Think Terrance Ferguson, R.J. Hampton, LaMelo Ball. The NBL announced a change to the program in 2019. Recently drafted players qualify as Next Stars, as a draft-and-stash option.
How does it work?
Next Stars are not included in regular roster count, and do not count as an import. No restrictions on nationality. Salaries do not count towards salary cap. Update: According to The Athletic, Next Stars get $100,000 in salary, along with other perks (apartment, vehicle, flights home during breaks). Draft-and-stash Next Stars are restricted to athletes who were drafted in the latest/most recent NBA draft. Undrafted players, and players from earlier drafts are not eligible. This was confirmed with the NBL.
 
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I'd argue that in a college atmosphere, they split their time between classwork and basketball. In the G-League, they can dedicate their whole selves to training. Provided they actually do it and have the institutional support from their team that they need, it seems like a no brainier that there is more potential for rapid development in the G-League.

The primary advantage of NCAA ball these days is visibility. No one watches the G-League. Everyone watches NCAA. Building a brand is easier there.
If my son at 18 or 19 years old was in this position. I would certainly prefer a college over the G league. College baseketball is big business and has professionals to develop players. They likely have bigger budgets than the G league teams do. I feel that for most people that age they still have a lot of growing up to do and being away from home is hard enough for a young person to make the right choices.. I just think the leadership, good coaches, good teammates and a staff can provide has a lot more to develop these teen aged young men in other areas besides just basketball. IT should be a big part of a good coaches plan., The reason so many of these young people fail is because of making the wrong choices an poor leadership and direction. I am not saying that is the case for KW but he certainly wishes he hadnt picked Kentucky and shouldnt have to sit a year. He should have options like coaches do!. Those are just my thoughts and one reason why it ticks me off a kid cant just transfer and not sit but grown coaches can. At 18 or 19 these young men need time to develop and grow on and off the court, and maybe even have a little fun. Most kids arent prepared for the real world at 18 and can use the guidance, commitment, and leadership a good coach and program could provide. Most kids need time to grow after high school on and off the court. KW or any player should be able to transfer now and that is what is sad. These programs shouldnt possess them and restrict them from being able to follow the best path for them personally. It is crap.
 
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Likes: Ga65
Who said G league is the only option? NBA scouts aren't only looking at G League and NCAA games. Sure NCAA and G League gets more visibility (NCAA much, much more so, but I think that's mostly from a fans perspective, scouts will find you if you've got the skill), but other overseas professional basketball leagues pay really well for an 18-22 year old. RJ Hampton, who famously skipped college to go play in the NBL (AU/NZ pro league) makes $100,000+ according to this article. Lamelo Ball makes a similar amount in the NBL from what I read. I don't see why KW couldn't do something similar. Why waste a year because of archaic NCAA transfer rules when you can go cash in on your talents, as well as showcase them for the NBA scouts.

In the Next Stars program like RJ Hampton and Lamelo are in, the players also get an apartment, vehicle, and other perks. Here's some text from a site describing the program:

"
What is this?
Overseas elite prospects who spend one year in the NBL instead of US college, typically bound for NBA. Think Terrance Ferguson, R.J. Hampton, LaMelo Ball. The NBL announced a change to the program in 2019. Recently drafted players qualify as Next Stars, as a draft-and-stash option.
How does it work?
Next Stars are not included in regular roster count, and do not count as an import. No restrictions on nationality. Salaries do not count towards salary cap. Update: According to The Athletic, Next Stars get $100,000 in salary, along with other perks (apartment, vehicle, flights home during breaks). Draft-and-stash Next Stars are restricted to athletes who were drafted in the latest/most recent NBA draft. Undrafted players, and players from earlier drafts are not eligible. This was confirmed with the NBL.
I think if you're truly going to be a star, that might work.

The advantage to the G-League is the midseason call up that you're not going to get if you're overseas. If you believe you can make it in the league, you want to stay close to home.
 
If a player's goal is to play professional basketball, then let's be real here, a year of education at UI is worth precisely $0. So yes, a year of G-League is worth more than that.
I am not sure that is necessarily correct. You get 12 months of room, board, training instruction and basketball skills instruction, in addition to the year of tuition that you may or may not receive any significant benefit from (i.e a year of African American studies courses from North Carolina versus year of communications, business, finance, etc. from UI), not to mention the social aspects that are not to be underestimated. If you take proper courses, they can be of significant benefit down the road to the player who plays professionally, even if you receive no degree. Not sure of the perks of the G-League, as I don't follow it at all, but I am guessing you have to pay for your rent and some of your food, some utilities (TV, internet), etc. so the $35K basically pays living expenses and income taxes. Maybe I am wrong, but I doubt there is much left over of the paycheck at the end of the season. If I am correct, then you get five months of room, board and instruction in the G league versus 12 months in college (plus the tuition).
 
Likes: 3 point girl
You are making the massive assumption that someone who is in the G League will make the NBA. Saying a college education is worth $0 is ludicrous, even for someone who wants to pursue the pros. There's a very good chance that a G League guy never makes the NBA. You mention that they could coach when they get done, but not in college without a degree!
Count me in the group of people who say stay in college. So many of these kids have dreams of one-and-done. It's good to dream but there are many more kids who have it in their minds that they are elite talents or are hyped as one-and-done than exist in reality. Part of the thinking seems to be centered on "burning" a year of playing time in college that could have been played professionally but if you ACTUALLY make it to the NBA and stay for say 5 or 6 years even, you are better off getting the extra developmental experience AND degree playing in college rather than risking a G-league or overseas career where your exposure is more limited. If you are good enough you will get minutes and get noticed. I think the reason many players who aren't talented enough enter the NBA draft after their freshman years decide to leave is that they don't want to put in the study time. It doesn't speak well to the work ethic. Only the Uber talented can get away with evading this harsh reality.
 
Likes: PlayAZ
Is this still a thing? I hope the kid has a good shot at his dream to play in the NBA. If he gets paid for a few years to play basketball good for him. At this point, it is ok to say the Illini could have developed him better. But to utilizing going forward is a mute point if it is not in his plan.