Mike Epstein out for season with knee injury

#2
Is it wrong to question why he was still getting carries while up so big?

Really feel for the kid.
 
#7
Austin, TX
Do we ever have injuries that aren’t season-ending?
 
#10
My three favorite players have all had serious injuries in the past few years, i feel so bad for the kid hope all turns out well and we see him next year
 
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#11
Lovie brought up a good point in his presser worth repeating. Mike was coming back from a serious foot injury. Maybe this will be a blessing in disguise and the extra time will allow the foot to heal completely and we'll get the best version of Mike.
 
#12
Illinois
Here's to Mike's return next fall with Luke Ford and Marquez Beason. We all wish you a speedy recovery and no more injuries!
Thoughts and prayers to everyone including Bobby Roundtree. I can't imagine the difficulties he and his family have gone through.
Best to all.
 
#13
Austin
Lovie brought up a good point in his presser worth repeating. Mike was coming back from a serious foot injury. Maybe this will be a blessing in disguise and the extra time will allow the foot to heal completely and we'll get the best version of Mike.
That’s just putting lipstick on a pig though as he’ll be coming off his second acl recovery. I wish him the best, but this is a tough break for him no matter how you slice it.
 
#14
This sucks for him. Hope he has a speedy and complete recovery.
 
#15
That’s just putting lipstick on a pig though as he’ll be coming off his second acl recovery. I wish him the best, but this is a tough break for him no matter how you slice it.
That's not what I read, which said he had two foot fractures and this is his 1st ACL. Not sure what's accurate.
 
#17
Anybody know if the knee is the same one he hurt in high school? Anyone know what type of knee injury he has and Beason as well. Seems to me coming back in a year can be optimistic for these ACL and/or MCL tears.
 
#18
It makes me sick to hear Mike Epstein is lost for the season.

How much adversity can one guy take?

If he were me, I'd say "that's enough."

But he ain't me - not by a longshot; I'm a wienie.

Mr. Epstein: do what's best for YOU!

If I were a billionaire, I'd plant grass: real staining, beautiful-smelling green grass (not loco weed, of course) in real dirt at Memorial Stadium.

Nothing wrong with a dream.

Best of luck to you, Mike. Your'e a big-time Illini.
 
#20
Austin
Anybody know if the knee is the same one he hurt in high school? Anyone know what type of knee injury he has and Beason as well. Seems to me coming back in a year can be optimistic for these ACL and/or MCL tears.
I don’t know which knee he hurt, but tearing one like he did in high school significantly increases the chance you will tear the other within 5 years (it could have been 15 but that seems like too big of a window). I saw the percentages (of tearing again by year) in a study posted on Reddit, but I can’t find it right now. (If you’re into that type of stuff it was a really cool read, I’ll try to find it)

For purely acl recovery, a regular person is walking without crutches, just living life, pretty soon after surgery (like sometimes the next day: I’ve seen it, it’s crazy). For football recovery you can be good to go in about 8-9 months. For basketball it takes a little longer because of the extreme jumping element. Adrian Peterson made a full recovery and started an nfl game in 9 months and his was ACL/MCL.

Another big factor is how they choose to fix it. Based on what’s best for the patient they will either take a graft of your patellar tendon, or use a cadaver acl. The benefit of the first is its your body, so no rejection, but the downside is you’re then recovering in 2 places, instead of one. The cadaver is the opposite, you face a chance that your body will reject it, but you have the benefit of only needing that one place to recover. Somebody I know who tore their acl had a graft taken from their hamstring (I think), so that would be like option 1, rehabbing 2 places.

So, basically, a year or less is doable (and the norm nowadays), but there’s A LOT of variables.
 
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#21
Another big factor is how they choose to fix it. Based on what’s best for the patient they will either take a graft of your patellar tendon, or use a cadaver acl. The benefit of the first is its your body, so no rejection, but the downside is you’re then recovering in 2 places, instead of one. The cadaver is the opposite, you face a chance that your body will reject it, but you have the benefit of only needing that one place to recover. Somebody I know who tore their acl had a graft taken from their hamstring (I think), so that would be like option 1, rehabbing 2 places.

So, basically, a year or less is doable (and the norm nowadays), but there’s A LOT of variables.
I got a cadaver graft. Tore Oct 9th, surgery Nov 9th, my Christmas present was being allowed to jog/run. I was hammering the stair climber and sled pretty hard at the beginning of Dec when the trainer caught me. Basically I felt pretty good a month after surgery. And my football program didn't have the resources of a University of Illinois.
Regardless of the route they take on the graft, they both should be 100% before camp next year
 
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#22
... Somebody I know who tore their acl had a graft taken from their hamstring (I think), so that would be like option 1, rehabbing 2 places.
Doesn't answer the short-term Epstein question, but I had ACL surgery in 1987 at Carle Clinic (was not in sports but the surgeon was the team's). My left hamstring, despite nearly daily hamstring curls etc, is much weaker than the right. Therapy is life-long. Aside from rain and arthritis issues, if I take I week off various leg strengthening exercises, the knee pain increases. What really started helping my knee pain, was when I took up running 5 years ago (because now everything is much stronger around the knee and I became diligent). I know the 80s was the stone-ages compared to now, but I always wonder what Dudek and others will face as they get older.
 
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#23
Doesn't answer the short-term Epstein question, but I had ACL surgery in 1987 at Carle Clinic (was not in sports but the surgeon was the team's). My left hamstring, despite nearly daily hamstring curls etc, is much weaker than the right. Therapy is life-long. Aside from rain and arthritis issues, if I take I week off various leg strengthening exercises, the knee pain increases. What really started helping my knee pain, was when I took up running 5 years ago (because now everything is much stronger around the knee and I became diligent). I know the 80s was the stone-ages compared to now, but I always wonder what Dudek and others will face as they get older.
Same exact experience separated by four years, including same knee, procedure, and doctor. Rehab is forever.
 
#24
There have been studies, but what's your gut feeling: does artifical turf have anything to do with all these season-ending leg/knee/ankle injuries?

Gale Sayers (my all-time favorite) was taken out by a Kermit Alexander hit, I think, not grass. The way Sayers ran you'd think he would have had some major lower-extremity injuries. I think he was pretty heathy until then. Got to do some research.
 
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