The G League

#26
I can’t wait for the one and done to be over, I think college basketball is better off without it. Who cares if they lose out on the 1% of players, I wish we could see changes to the transfer rule too.

Ja Morant is an incredible basketball player but he wasn’t NBA Ja Morant before playing in college. I think a lot of kids will go the NBA route right out of high school and realize they made a huge mistake.
 
#27
The one thing I will never understand about people’s logic who ARE NOT in the position that these young players are in is....you’re telling me you’d rather go to college for a year or two and earn no money for the “experience” instead of going to play pro basketball and earning a living, if even for just a couple years? College will ALWAYS be there. Going pro will not. Never understood that line of thinking. If you have a chance to make money now, go do that. If you were the parent of any of these kids, you’d be telling them to go to the league or even the G League for that matter. You can still have the college experience in your mid 20s if pro ball doesn’t work out.
 
#28
The one thing I will never understand about people’s logic who ARE NOT in the position that these young players are in is....you’re telling me you’d rather go to college for a year or two and earn no money for the “experience” instead of going to play pro basketball and earning a living, if even for just a couple years? College will ALWAYS be there. Going pro will not. Never understood that line of thinking. If you have a chance to make money now, go do that. If you were the parent of any of these kids, you’d be telling them to go to the league or even the G League for that matter. You can still have the college experience in your mid 20s if pro ball doesn’t work out.
I had that same conversation and a lot of the parents I know want their kids to have that college experience! Something that you'll never forget like that senior year of high-school! The prom.. etc...
 
#29
I had that same conversation and a lot of the parents I know want their kids to have that college experience! Something that you'll never forget like that senior year of high-school! The prom.. etc...
I’d never forget that first fat paycheck, but I’m a teacher so I guess it’s good I got the college experience.
 
#30
The one thing I will never understand about people’s logic who ARE NOT in the position that these young players are in is....you’re telling me you’d rather go to college for a year or two and earn no money for the “experience” instead of going to play pro basketball and earning a living, if even for just a couple years? College will ALWAYS be there. Going pro will not. Never understood that line of thinking. If you have a chance to make money now, go do that. If you were the parent of any of these kids, you’d be telling them to go to the league or even the G League for that matter. You can still have the college experience in your mid 20s if pro ball doesn’t work out.
Am I reading this wrong.You can't play college sports after you've played pro sports.
 
#31
Am I reading this wrong.You can't play college sports after you've played pro sports.
I think he just means he can always go back to get a college degree... once you sign or hire and agent to go pro you college eligibility is gone for ever.. hence why lamelo ball got denied by the ncaa to play at kansas.. because he went over seas and played pro ball in Lithuania before he graduated highschool...
 
#32
Grand Island Ne
Am I reading this wrong.You can't play college sports after you've played pro sports.
From one old dude to another the OP does not mention going back to college to play a sport, it's to just get the degree.
I don't think many athletes actually do this, you do read about a few and you need to make enough cash to finance the education you may have gotten for free.
 
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#33
Am I reading this wrong.You can't play college sports after you've played pro sports.
And that is probably the disconnect here. I believe the OP was saying that you can get the "college experience", but I don't think most of these kids want that; a lot want the "college basketball experience."

EDIT: Yeah, I was late. Same point as others above.
 
#34
The one thing I will never understand about people’s logic who ARE NOT in the position that these young players are in is....you’re telling me you’d rather go to college for a year or two and earn no money for the “experience” instead of going to play pro basketball and earning a living, if even for just a couple years? College will ALWAYS be there. Going pro will not. Never understood that line of thinking. If you have a chance to make money now, go do that. If you were the parent of any of these kids, you’d be telling them to go to the league or even the G League for that matter. You can still have the college experience in your mid 20s if pro ball doesn’t work out.
I don't really agree here. Yes, if you really are good enough for the NBA, I think you should be able to go. College shouldn't be forced. *(Although, it should be pointed out that this is an NBA rule, and it is THEIR league, so they are the ones who decided they don't want kids straight out of HS.)*

If a player is going to go pro and play in the G league for "a couple years" and then flame out, I'm guessing that player would have much preferred the fanfare of college basketball for a couple years.

I guess I think of those people out of high school that say "I'm going to work for a year or two, then go to college." Most never end up going to college. If they are smart and hard working and find a good job or career, that is awesome; college is not for everyone, but I don't know that is the case for most.
 
#35
What a lot of people overlook is that physical maturity/skills is only part of the makeup for a successful professional basketball player, whether it is G league, NBA, or overseas. My first 2 years of college didnt prepare me for my chosen field. It did help me mature & learn how to be on my own, schedule my time wisely, & learn how to interact with peers/profeesors. These kids are on their own on the road at least 50% of the time with grown men way past their maturity level. Alcohol, drugs, & women are at their feet daily. Lots of professional athletes, not just basketball, cant handle the mental aspect & lose their way.
 
#36
Michigan
Wonder if the virus is entering the commits minds regarding the season. Sounds like campuses may be shut in the fall, if so, unfortunately likely no hoops.
It's on everyone's mind. The dance is the NCAA's biggest money maker, so I suspect that they will do everything possible to make it happen. November might be problematic, but I suspect they would rather have some season and a tournament in April, over no season. And schools are going to be hurting. People are going to have to make some hard choices about whether to pay those tuition bills and attend.

Really hard to predict anything at this juncture.
 
#38
Tough for me to believe that they are going to expand their expenditures when the have lost the revenue for the playoffs and probably all attendance for the rest of the year. Assuming the players are still getting paid they are bleeding cash.
 
#39
The only thing the G league has that is more of a benefit than college basketball is the legal money, that’s it. The trainers or coaches in the G league aren’t any better than the trainers or coaches at Duke or any other top 25 caliber team in college basketball. If you don’t want to go to class and would rather make money in a developmental league then go to the G league.
This makes absolutely no sense. Let's assume that the coaches and trainers in the two leagues are equivalent. A high-level prospect has two options: G-League or NCAA. Let's examine.

G-League
  • Not a lot of TV or fan exposure
  • Paid legally (varying amounts but mostly not a ton)
  • Training by folks with direct connection to current NBA
  • Direct exposure to NBA scouts and GMs
  • Ability to devote 100% of your time and effort to getting better at basketball

NCAA
  • Likely a tone of TV and fan exposure
  • Paid under the table or not at all (varies widely)
  • Training by folks with a varying degree of experience with the NBA
  • Exposure comes through TV etc.
  • Must split time between passing classes and basketball

Tell me again why this is a no-brainer? Even if the coaching and training staffs in the NCAA were appreciably better than in the G-League (I doubt it is generally true), there is still a lot going for a player who chooses the G-League route if the ultimate goal is playing in the NBA.
 
#40
This makes absolutely no sense. Let's assume that the coaches and trainers in the two leagues are equivalent. A high-level prospect has two options: G-League or NCAA. Let's examine.

G-League
  • Not a lot of TV or fan exposure
  • Paid legally (varying amounts but mostly not a ton)
  • Training by folks with direct connection to current NBA
  • Direct exposure to NBA scouts and GMs
  • Ability to devote 100% of your time and effort to getting better at basketball

NCAA
  • Likely a tone of TV and fan exposure
  • Paid under the table or not at all (varies widely)
  • Training by folks with a varying degree of experience with the NBA
  • Exposure comes through TV etc.
  • Must split time between passing classes and basketball

Tell me again why this is a no-brainer? Even if the coaching and training staffs in the NCAA were appreciably better than in the G-League (I doubt it is generally true), there is still a lot going for a player who chooses the G-League route if the ultimate goal is playing in the NBA.
You forgot some things.

NCAA
  • Get a degree so you can do something with your life after you're done with basketball (especially if you get injured)
  • Meet and socialize with a broad group of lifelong friends your own age
  • Gain maturity in a structured environment and strong support system
 
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#41
This makes absolutely no sense. Let's assume that the coaches and trainers in the two leagues are equivalent. A high-level prospect has two options: G-League or NCAA. Let's examine.

G-League
  • Not a lot of TV or fan exposure
  • Paid legally (varying amounts but mostly not a ton)
  • Training by folks with direct connection to current NBA
  • Direct exposure to NBA scouts and GMs
  • Ability to devote 100% of your time and effort to getting better at basketball

NCAA
  • Likely a tone of TV and fan exposure
  • Paid under the table or not at all (varies widely)
  • Training by folks with a varying degree of experience with the NBA
  • Exposure comes through TV etc.
  • Must split time between passing classes and basketball

Tell me again why this is a no-brainer? Even if the coaching and training staffs in the NCAA were appreciably better than in the G-League (I doubt it is generally true), there is still a lot going for a player who chooses the G-League route if the ultimate goal is playing in the NBA.
There is also no telling how bringing in top prospects will change a lot of what the G-League is, and who is involved. It will get more interest from fans. I don't think there is any doubt whatsoever about that. It will never get to NCAA levels, because we root for specific jerseys more than specific players, but having the best prospects will make it more appealing to broadcasters and advertisers. These things will lead to better exposure for coaches, which will improve the caliber of coach at that level, and more investment from the league in the form of trainers. When you aren't simply keeping 13th men in shape incase of injury, but really developing the next generation of superstars, the math for the league, and their investment changes dramatically on numerous fronts.
 
#42
This makes absolutely no sense. Let's assume that the coaches and trainers in the two leagues are equivalent. A high-level prospect has two options: G-League or NCAA. Let's examine.

G-League
  • Not a lot of TV or fan exposure
  • Paid legally (varying amounts but mostly not a ton)
  • Training by folks with direct connection to current NBA
  • Direct exposure to NBA scouts and GMs
  • Ability to devote 100% of your time and effort to getting better at basketball

NCAA
  • Likely a tone of TV and fan exposure
  • Paid under the table or not at all (varies widely)
  • Training by folks with a varying degree of experience with the NBA
  • Exposure comes through TV etc.
  • Must split time between passing classes and basketball

Tell me again why this is a no-brainer? Even if the coaching and training staffs in the NCAA were appreciably better than in the G-League (I doubt it is generally true), there is still a lot going for a player who chooses the G-League route if the ultimate goal is playing in the NBA.
When did I ever say it was a no brainer? All I’m saying is there is two different options. So coach K doesn’t have connections to the nba? lol you don’t think blue blood coaches have connections to the NBA? Also, only certain players are going to get $500,000 to play in the G league, not all players. Anybody that is saying that the NCAA is done for is a joke, the NCAA is better off without these players.
 
#43
Professional Social Distancer
Virginia
I don't pay any attention to the G-League, because, well, I have about 5M better things to do, but I'd take a wild guess the Coaches at the schools these kids would likely go to in the NCAA are better than G-League. G-Leaguer candidates are not going to middle of the road NCAA programs.

That being said, I really don't care much as both the NBA and G-League are unwatchable. The NCAA is going to long be a draw - hard to beat school/team spirit and devotion. You'd have to strip out probably 3 or 4 G-Leagues worth of talent to make me notice (the league is filled with more than just incoming Freshman - so there is only so much room for fresh-guys). Yes, the Zions are not going to be around a season, but there are really not that many Zions out there.
 
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#44
You forgot some things.

NCAA
  • Get a degree so you can do something with your life after you're done with basketball (especially if you get injured)
    • You can get a degree any time. People aren't limited to going to college only at age 18. Going to the G-League and earning some dough doesn't stop someone from earning a degree later if it doesn't work out.
  • Meet and socialize with a broad group of lifelong friends your own age
    • Guess who else plays in the G-League.
  • Gain maturity in a structured environment and strong support system
    • This can happen in any environment. Plenty of non-athlete college students flame out because they can't get the whole responsibility thing down and plenty of people who don't go go college are perfectly responsible adult human beings without needing college to somehow force them to grow up.
See above.
 
#45
I did not know that Rod Strickland is the commissioner of the G League. That sort of says it all there.
 
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#46
I did not know that Rod Strickland is the commissioner of the G League. That sort of says it all there.
I don't get this. He's not the commissioner. He's the "program manager" for the league"s "professional path," whatever that means. Shareef Abdul-Raheem is the league president. I don't think it has a "commissioner."

And why is having a 15+ year NBA vet with coaching and administrative experience at the college level a negative for the league?
 
#47
I don't pay any attention to the G-League, because, well, I have about 5M better things to do, but I'd take a wild guess the Coaches at the schools these kids would likely go to in the NCAA are better than G-League. G-Leaguer candidates are not going to middle of the road NCAA programs..
This could be right but is going to be very difficult to prove. Plenty of good coaches have come out of the G League, particularly relative to its lifespan. Nick Nurse and Dave Joerger being two that quickly come to mind.
 
#49
The nba is barely watchable.
That being said, I really don't care much as both the NBA and G-League are unwatchable.
Why make these arguments about what is better potential career pathway for young basketball players when it is ultra-clear -- because you said it -- that your opinions are biased by your views about the quality of the product for the viewer? Plenty of people would say the exact same thing about Big Ten basketball. Those views don't matter since all players want to get to the NBA, regardless of whether you think it's watchable, and the NBA is clearly doing just fine from an interest/money-generating perspective.

I also disagree that losing elite talent wouldn't hurt the NCAA. Ratings have steadily declined since the 90s as fewer and fewer players stick around for more than two years, if they have a shot at the NBA. Losing even more elite talent directly out of HS would further chip away at NCAA viewership, particularly when you factor in how young people follow basketball.
 
#50
Professional Social Distancer
Virginia
Why make these arguments about what is better potential career pathway for young basketball players when it is ultra-clear -- because you said it -- that your opinions are biased by your views about the quality of the product for the viewer? Plenty of people would say the exact same thing about Big Ten basketball. Those views don't matter since all players want to get to the NBA, regardless of whether you think it's watchable, and the NBA is clearly doing just fine from an interest/money-generating perspective.

I also disagree that losing elite talent wouldn't hurt the NCAA. Ratings have steadily declined since the 90s as fewer and fewer players stick around for more than two years, if they have a shot at the NBA. Losing even more elite talent directly out of HS would further chip away at NCAA viewership, particularly when you factor in how young people follow basketball.
I am not making an argument for a potential better career path for anyone. Everyone should chose what is best for their needs/desires. If i anywhere gave that impression, it was not my intent. My only point was the GLeague and NBA are, IMO, not entertaining to watch - until the playoff at best (NBA).

I do disagree on ratings being affected by the level of talent. I'd wager there is enough talent on the court today with the top skimmed off to beat the majority of the teams in the 90s - as a general rule of course - there were some very talented teams. But overall, the level of talent and skill has improved because of year round play and because a lot of kids are concentrating on one sport these days. So compared to 30 years ago - skill is not the issue. Heck, i am pretty sure we were still shooting free throws with two hands back then and dunks were technicals ;)

Seems to me students would rather drink in a bar than attend anything except an elite game. Times and priorities have changed.