21 Year Championship Drought for the B1G

#1      
M tipping over
Pdx
This has come up in a few different threads so I thought it would be good to give it its own thread. The B1G has had a 21 year drought for crowing tournament champions. I didn’t realize that the B1G has contended in 7 of those and lost each one. So the B1G is 0-7 in championship games.
Some thoughts from the talking heads… what do you think?
 
#2      
Someone suggested earlier (as I recall) that a commissioner worth his salt would convene a group to investigate the 21 year drought. Why 0-7? Is it that officiating changes in the tourney (or is just different than Big Ten standards in the tourney) and we're not adapting?

I'm sure there are better thought out points than this, but that post resonated with me. Why wouldn't the best conference in the country be concerned and be proactive about it?
 
#3      
Someone suggested earlier (as I recall) that a commissioner worth his salt would convene a group to investigate the 21 year drought. Why 0-7? Is it that officiating changes in the tourney (or is just different than Big Ten standards in the tourney) and we're not adapting?

I'm sure there are better thought out points than this, but that post resonated with me. Why wouldn't the best conference in the country be concerned and be proactive about it?
Especially when across the board, Big ten has what is considered to be an exceptionally high level of coaches.
 
#4      
Invisible and Bulletproof
Miracle Mile
Someone suggested earlier (as I recall) that a commissioner worth his salt would convene a group to investigate the 21 year drought. Why 0-7? Is it that officiating changes in the tourney (or is just different than Big Ten standards in the tourney) and we're not adapting?

I'm sure there are better thought out points than this, but that post resonated with me. Why wouldn't the best conference in the country be concerned and be proactive about it?
Don't get your hopes up for anything sensible or proactive to occur under the current commissioner.
 
#5      
Don't get your hopes up for anything sensible or proactive to occur under the current commissioner.
First he would have a press conference making an announcement, could it be a proactive measure or sensible decision? Perhaps, but we won’t find out because a statement will be released a day or so later contradicting the whole press conference.
 
#6      
While the championship drought is disappointing, I think it's pretty impressive that the B1G has had six different schools reach the championship game during that 0-7 period (Michigan twice). Other conferences are much more top-heavy with multiple appearances from one or two schools.
 
#9      
A mixture of shooters and quickness along with an agile big man rim protector is needed in today's basketball and no big ten team had this combination. As long as the refs let them play mugger basketball the bad trend will continue.
 
#10      
M tipping over
Pdx
This comes up often and it’s not a big secret. 5 teams have won 13 of those 20 championships. It has nothing to do with officiating or beating each other up in the regular season. It’s being consistently good enough to put yourself in the best position to win and catching a few breaks along the way.

Duke - 3
UConn -3
UNC - 3
FL -2
Villanova -2
What would you say is the common denominator among those teams? Talent? Coaching? Both? Something else?
 
#11      
Normal, Illinois
While the Big Ten constantly has a lot of good teams, very rarely have any of those teams been among the best in the nation and when they are, there's always a team that's a little better/hotter/luckier/had better coaching. Here's a refresher of those losses. When evaluating the talent levels, I'll be doing a shallow analysis of which teams had more NBA talent (which of course isn't the sole reason for these results), even if most of the players listed here amounted to nothing more than role players in the pros.

2002: Indiana loses to Maryland: I was too young to watch this season, but from what I've gathered Indiana as a 5 seed went on a magical run while Maryland was a 1 seed, so the better team won.
2005: North Carolina had more NBA talent, but the Illini's cohesiveness and 3-point shooting brought them back in the game. Unfortunately couldn't finish, and the refs letting Sean May be a bully didn't help matters, so we'll chalk this loss up to bad luck.
2007: Ohio State loses to Florida: While the Buckeyes had NBA talent in Marcus Conley and Greg Oden (whose body failed him in the NBA) and were an incredible team that year, they were just no match for the Noah-Horford Gators, who kept hitting big shot after big shot to keep the Buckeyes at bay. Gators were the better team.
2009: Michigan State gets drubbed by North Carolina, who had Tyler Hansbrough, Wayne Ellington, Ty Lawson, and Danny Green, all who went on to have solid NBA careers. Tar Heels obviously the better team here.
2013: Michigan loses to Louisville: This is one where you could attribute this to Louisville being hotter and inspired. This was the year Kevin Ware suffered that gruesome leg injury, and that rallied a very good Louisville team even closer together. In terms of NBA talent, Louisville had only Gorgui Dieng and a freshman Montrezl Harrell, but Michigan had Trey Burke, Glenn Robinson, and Tim Hardaway, Jr. This loss can be attributed to the hotness/inspiration factor, as well as the fact that Louisville played better team ball while Michigan relied too much on Burke in the 2nd half of the game.
2015: Wisconsin loses to Duke: This is a game that I feel Wisconsin should have won. The Blue Devils had Tyus Jones, Jahlil Okafor, Justise Winslow, and Greyson Allen, but for the most of this game it seemed Wisconsin's cohesiveness from their starting 5 was going to be enough to put them over the top. I'll attribute this loss partially to talent but more so to superior coaching from Duke.
2018: Michigan gets blasted by Villanova: The Wolverines had no shot here. Villanova had 4 of their starting 5 drafted in the NBA (Jalen Brunson, Omari Spellman, Mikal Bridges, Eric Paschall), while Michigan had...Mo Wagner. Michigan had a hot run to make it to the game, but Villanova had a Baylor-like run that year and were never seriously challenged in the tournament. The better team won.

Final tally: 4 to better talent, 2 to superior coaching, 1 to bad luck. Big Ten just hasn't had a team able to cap off a magical run the few opportunities the team has been talented enough to do so.
 
#12      
While the Big Ten constantly has a lot of good teams, very rarely have any of those teams been among the best in the nation and when they are, there's always a team that's a little better/hotter/luckier/had better coaching. Here's a refresher of those losses. When evaluating the talent levels, I'll be doing a shallow analysis of which teams had more NBA talent (which of course isn't the sole reason for these results), even if most of the players listed here amounted to nothing more than role players in the pros.

2002: Indiana loses to Maryland: I was too young to watch this season, but from what I've gathered Indiana as a 5 seed went on a magical run while Maryland was a 1 seed, so the better team won.
2005: North Carolina had more NBA talent, but the Illini's cohesiveness and 3-point shooting brought them back in the game. Unfortunately couldn't finish, and the refs letting Sean May be a bully didn't help matters, so we'll chalk this loss up to bad luck.
2007: Ohio State loses to Florida: While the Buckeyes had NBA talent in Marcus Conley and Greg Oden (whose body failed him in the NBA) and were an incredible team that year, they were just no match for the Noah-Horford Gators, who kept hitting big shot after big shot to keep the Buckeyes at bay. Gators were the better team.
2009: Michigan State gets drubbed by North Carolina, who had Tyler Hansbrough, Wayne Ellington, Ty Lawson, and Danny Green, all who went on to have solid NBA careers. Tar Heels obviously the better team here.
2013: Michigan loses to Louisville: This is one where you could attribute this to Louisville being hotter and inspired. This was the year Kevin Ware suffered that gruesome leg injury, and that rallied a very good Louisville team even closer together. In terms of NBA talent, Louisville had only Gorgui Dieng and a freshman Montrezl Harrell, but Michigan had Trey Burke, Glenn Robinson, and Tim Hardaway, Jr. This loss can be attributed to the hotness/inspiration factor, as well as the fact that Louisville played better team ball while Michigan relied too much on Burke in the 2nd half of the game.
2015: Wisconsin loses to Duke: This is a game that I feel Wisconsin should have won. The Blue Devils had Tyus Jones, Jahlil Okafor, Justise Winslow, and Greyson Allen, but for the most of this game it seemed Wisconsin's cohesiveness from their starting 5 was going to be enough to put them over the top. I'll attribute this loss partially to talent but more so to superior coaching from Duke.
2018: Michigan gets blasted by Villanova: The Wolverines had no shot here. Villanova had 4 of their starting 5 drafted in the NBA (Jalen Brunson, Omari Spellman, Mikal Bridges, Eric Paschall), while Michigan had...Mo Wagner. Michigan had a hot run to make it to the game, but Villanova had a Baylor-like run that year and were never seriously challenged in the tournament. The better team won.

Final tally: 4 to better talent, 2 to superior coaching, 1 to bad luck. Big Ten just hasn't had a team able to cap off a magical run the few opportunities the team has been talented enough to do so.
Might move the Wisconsin loss from superior coaching to bad luck. Main reason Duke won that game is Greyson Allen, who really hadn’t been a big contributor that year, played out of his mind. Take away his performance and badgers win.
 
#13      
Might move the Wisconsin loss from superior coaching to bad luck. Main reason Duke won that game is Greyson Allen, who really hadn’t been a big contributor that year, played out of his mind. Take away his performance and badgers win.

I think there was also a hangover factor in that Wiscy loss. They'd just beaten one of the most dominate (38-0) and loaded (#1 overall, #6 overall, an unbelievable total of FOUR lottery picks, and six total to the league) teams in history. An epic semi-final, and one of the best take-downs in NCAA history IMO. Really a shame they had them before the final.
 
#14      
It was discussed on another thread that the Big Ten sends fewer players to the NBA, relative to the other high-major conferences. I suspect programs/leagues with more NBA talent win more national titles.
 
#15      
This comes up often and it’s not a big secret. 5 teams have won 13 of those 20 championships. It has nothing to do with officiating or beating each other up in the regular season. It’s being consistently good enough to put yourself in the best position to win and catching a few breaks along the way.

Duke - 3
UConn -3
UNC - 3
FL -2
Villanova -2
Where’s Kentucky and Kansas? Blue bloods gone bad?