Name, Image, Likeness Rule

#3      
‘...rules that would provide athletes with varying degrees of new protections and opportunities to make money by selling the their name, image and likeness (NIL) rights while playing in college.’

This is long overdue. What is any person without their “name, image and likeness”. These belong to each of us as our “property”. We do not allow use of “property” without just compensation (outright purchase of, rights to use of, etc.)

In real estate, this is called a “Bundle of Rights”. These include: Control, Ownership, Occupancy, Use, Possession, and Enjoyment. Each of us as “persons” has an aspect that relates to each of these Rights Bundles. Institutions have benefitted (sometimes GREATLY) from using these Personal Rights Bundles without paying any just compensation (sure, there’s the argument about providing education but that is more barter and trade than anything else). Institutions have been able to “control” a player’s image and “foreclose” on their ability to earn money), and to have rights of “enjoyment” over the player’s “property” like someone living in a house without paying rent or owning it.

We ARE our name (legally), image (physically), and likeness (ways to present ourselves). And since college players do not have the ability to make money as “employees” or other such subdivisions of the institution they play for, it’s only fair that they be compensated for any use of their “personage”.

Hopefully the powers-that-be get this right and have a fair and equitable formula for rewarding the players in a just way.
 
#4      
Spokane, WA
I haven't read anything recently on the Illinois NIL bill. Seems like it kind of stalled out since January? And please don't turn this into a politics argument (thank you in advance)... it is not your typical left/right issue, either.

Things are going to change very quickly because Arizona and Alabama have already passed laws that take effect in July, as if those state schools were not already recruiting well enough.

This website has a nifty state-by-state breakdown of legislation: https://businessofcollegesports.com/tracker-name-image-and-likeness-legislation-by-state/
 
#5      
Free education?
Yes I did play college sports and my son was a scholarship D1 athlete for four years. You help make my point. Joe sophomore is probably trying to make money to help pay for his education. Major D1 sports athletes are getting scholarships worth anywhere from 120k to 300k(just guessing), its like winning the lottery. No tuition bills or student loans for them or their parents.
I don't understand why compensation (in the form of a scholarship) for their athletic skills should preclude them from participating in the market as anybody else can. If Joe Sophomore receives a full-ride for his academic prowess, is he not allowed to start a t-shirt business? Of course not. So what's the rationale for treating an athlete any different?

Funnily enough, a real-life example of Joe Sophomore is a guy very familiar to this board: Joe Tipton, who built up Tipton Edits while at U. of Alabama-Huntsville. Here's an illustrative quote from an article about him: "He’s a presidential scholar at UAH and doesn’t need the money for school, but it’s enough extra cash that he also doesn’t need a part-time job to pay for dinner and a movie. 'So, it’s nice to have a little fun,' he said."

The scholarship, whether athletic or academic, is not "free education" or "lottery" winnings -- it is the base compensation for bringing one's skills to a particular institution. Athletes should have the same opportunity to earn extra cash 'incentives' based on their excellence in popular athletics just as Tipton does based on his excellence in popular graphic design and marketing.
 
#6      
"All the profit?" This statement is too extreme. What about the value of the education they receive, the support services (I used to tutor college athletes and every athlete irregardless of revenue sports gets these types of support), coaching, exposure? Most players never get to a professional league. Those that don't would either have to pay for their own expenses or not pursue sports. Anyone with kids knows how expensive it is to have top notch coaching. Where would that money come from for the underprivileged families?
I am not arguing that there be no payments, but its my opinion that there are important non-monetary benefits provided to college athletes that are often overlooked.
As a tutor, did you let your students know the irregardless is not a word?
Regardless would be correct.
 
#7      
Forgottonia
As a tutor, did you let your students know the irregardless is not a word?
Regardless would be correct.

Frequently Asked Questions About irregardless


Is irregardless a word?​

Yes. It may not be a word that you like, or a word that you would use in a term paper, but irregardless certainly is a word. It has been in use for well over 200 years, employed by a large number of people across a wide geographic range and with a consistent meaning. That is why we, and well-nigh every other dictionary of modern English, define this word. Remember that a definition is not an endorsement of a word’s use.

🤷‍♂️;)
 
#8      
As a tutor, did you let your students know the irregardless is not a word?
Regardless would be correct.
Oh this is a proper message board :) Fair enough. Fortunately for the student athletes, my command of grammar was not applicable because I covered math/stats/economics. I'd never attempt to tutor anything close to language arts.
 
#9      
D1 revenue sport athletes are generating major $ for their schools. It's only fair that they should get a share of the pie.
D1 sports also generate major expenses. The fact is that the majority of athletic programs lose money (granted, much of that is due to so called nonrevenue sports). For instance, Iowa cut four sports programs this year and still had to borrow $50 million to meet payroll. Our own program has debt in excess of $300 million and needed to borrow another $33million this year in order to balance the budget.

I realize that the NIL proposal will not come from the DIA or the university. Just responding to the notion that because some programs bring in a lot of revenue that the athletes deserve a piece of the perceived pie.
 
#11      
The scholarship, whether athletic or academic, is not "free education" or "lottery" winnings -- it is the base compensation for bringing one's skills to a particular institution.
I'll agree with this for athletics. I'm not sure how it applies to undergrad academic scholarships (UAS).

Academic scholarship often have no requirements on the recipient beyond take a normal class load, and get passable grades. The donor gets to set the criterion for who gets the scholarship. Their criterion can be pretty much anything they want, e.g. be an E.T. from the Byzantine neighborhood**. It really is free money. The hardest part is knowing to look for a given scholarship.

** See prior scandals about people setting up very specific scholarships for each others kids, thereby avoiding all taxes on the money.
 
#13      
Academic scholarship often have no requirements on the recipient beyond take a normal class load, and get passable grades. The donor gets to set the criterion for who gets the scholarship.
Haha good point. I was thinking of full ride academic scholarships sponsored by the institution, those based on one's achievement and with criteria set by the institution. For the school, attracting high-achieving students has a lot of value on its own (and might literally pay off if the student becomes successful and themselves a donor). My point is those scholarships are compensation from the school for "taking their talents" to that school rather than a competitor, and just b/c their education is paid for doesn't mean they should be restricted from certain business opportunities elsewhere (as is the case already, and it should be the same for athletics).
 
#14      
Westfield, IN
Am I correct in assuming that any monies earned from this NIL would be taxable as income at the fed/state levels?
 
#15      
Ordained Dudeist Priest
Johns Creek, GA
Am I correct in assuming that any monies earned from this NIL would be taxable as income at the fed/state levels?
All monies earned are subject to taxes in the wonderful U.S. of A., but if they're getting cash for photos/autographs/whatever it's easy to "forget" about that income.
 
#16      
Westfield, IN
All monies earned are subject to taxes in the wonderful U.S. of A., but if they're getting cash for photos/autographs/whatever it's easy to "forget" about that income.
Thanks, much like cash tips to wait staff
 
#17      
IL metro east burbs of St. Louis
All monies earned are subject to taxes in the wonderful U.S. of A., but if they're getting cash for photos/autographs/whatever it's easy to "forget" about that income.
It would also be easy for the IRS to document these occasions in todays social media world. So yah they can try but the gov't will get their taxes one way or another. I would also guess this would go against any code of conduct teams/schools have with their students. I am sure their would be something in their if the kid got caught for tax evasion.
 
#18      
New Orleans
NIL taking off in SEC and other Southern schools. State legislation being passed, schools developing classes for implementing it, for Student athletes for taking advantage of it, and writing boiler-plate contracts for revenue sharing . Louisiana legislature passing bills now to begin implementation July 1st. Apparently LSU and Tulane staff are meeting with boosters to plan ways to implement the new plan assuming NCAA approval. They see it as a great recruiting tool for those schools who get on board first and most 'creatively'. , and as a game changer for college athletics. Safe to say they are using NIL as a recruiting tool and to attract transfers. (I am retired in New Orleans and have been watching NIL develop here. Wouldn't surprise me if LSU laid out some potential 'deals' for AM)
 
#19      
NIL taking off in SEC and other Southern schools. State legislation being passed, schools developing classes for implementing it, for Student athletes for taking advantage of it, and writing boiler-plate contracts for revenue sharing . Louisiana legislature passing bills now to begin implementation July 1st. Apparently LSU and Tulane staff are meeting with boosters to plan ways to implement the new plan assuming NCAA approval. They see it as a great recruiting tool for those schools who get on board first and most 'creatively'. , and as a game changer for college athletics. Safe to say they are using NIL as a recruiting tool and to attract transfers. (I am retired in New Orleans and have been watching NIL develop here. Wouldn't surprise me if LSU laid out some potential 'deals' for AM)
If you write it, they will come?
I am a little jealous Illinois is not taking an aggressive recruiting focused stance on NIL.
 
#20      
New Orleans
If you write it, they will come?
I am a little jealous Illinois is not taking an aggressive recruiting focused stance on NIL.
Same here I see a real opportunity for sports management/legal firms to get into this business, and would hope the DIA works arm in arm with them to get the best (above board) deals for the athlete and the school. I bet there is already enough talent in the Law, Business, and Marketing schools to create a world class public/private marketing and promotion service for the athletes.
 
#21      
If you write it, they will come?
I am a little jealous Illinois is not taking an aggressive recruiting focused stance on NIL.
I agree. The states that get out in front of this will give their universities an advantage until the rest catch up. I hate the thought that freakin' Louisiana will function more efficiently than Illinois.
 
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#22      
I agree. The states that get out in front of this will give their universities an advantage until the rest catch up. I hate the thought that freakin' Louisiana will function more efficiently than Illinois.
Well it could make football better so gotta do what it takes. I Imagine Texas will live in an NIL land all its own head and shoulders above everybody when they figure it out.
 
#24      
Forgottonia
Do NIL rules address the school attire? I would assume a current player can appear in Illini uniforms and be paid for their likeness, but are there specific circumstances tied to that? Schools will want some control over their brand still. Just curious if anyone knows.
 
#25      
Dallas-Fort Worth
I agree. The states that get out in front of this will give their universities an advantage until the rest catch up. I hate the thought that freakin' Louisiana will function more efficiently than Illinois.

Just getting caught up in this thread. Problem is, you can’t use the words efficient and Illinois* in the same sentence.

Even, sadly, when comparing to LA.

* The State, not the University