Name, Image, Likeness Rule

#301      

IlliniKat91

Chicago, IL
I'd be surprised if they don't have a printing company that is just makes them on demand. I, as small business, have this option with a small local printing company.
I work at a school and we have a partnership with a local printer for spirit wear. They'll print on demand, but it'll cost. We can absorb that as a large district. I doubt these kids have that kind of seed money to start.
 
#302      
I work at a school and we have a partnership with a local printer for spirit wear. They'll print on demand, but it'll cost. We can absorb that as a large district. I doubt these kids have that kind of seed money to start.
Everyone but Trent and DMW have signed deals with a regional (but started here) printer/merch company.
 
#303      
A new research study dropped today from the American Psychological Association regarding identity and attitudes toward paying college athletes. Not sure if this fully fits in the NIL thread, but alas, it's an interesting read.

Citation​

Sargent, M. J. (2022). Skin in the game: Race, ingroup identification, and attitudes toward paying college athletes. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/cdp0000520


Abstract​

Objectives: The present studies examined two dimensions of racial ingroup identification, using them as predictors of Black and White Americans’ attitudes toward paying college athletes. Following Leach et al. (2008), the present work distinguished between ingroup self-investment and ingroup self-definition. The central prediction was that respondent race and self-investment would interact in predicting compensation support. Method: In three studies (N = 352, N = 476, & N = 562), U.S. residents who were 18 or older and either Black or White completed an online survey in which they completed a self-report measure of racial identification, as well as reporting their opinion of paying college athletes. Results: The results supported the prediction, demonstrating that Black respondents’ support was higher than that for Whites, but this was especially the case at high levels of self-investment. The third study suggests that these effects were driven by respondents who believed that Black athletes made up a larger percentage of the pool of likely beneficiaries of compensation. Ingroup self-definition played no role as a moderator. Conclusions: Broadly speaking, it may be that, for policies whose likely beneficiaries are disproportionately Black, stronger racial self-investment serves to widen racial divides in support. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)