Name, Image, Likeness Rule

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Pac-12 and SEC commissioners go to Washington DC to ask for "help" with NIL policies.

 
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Interesting quote:

"The goal is to discuss a few of the issues facing college athletics with influential senators," Kliavkoff said. "I think it's more likely that we eventually get federal legislation on name, image and likeness, but we're also interested in discussing all of the harm that will come to student-athletes if they are deemed to be employees."

What exactly are the harms that will come to athletes by being deemed employees?

Health insurance? Collective bargaining? Worker's comp? Retirement benefits? A salary?

Interesting that the "harms" we're trying to protect these athletes from are what most of us were hoping to achieve upon graduation when we went to college ourselves.
 
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Interesting quote:

"The goal is to discuss a few of the issues facing college athletics with influential senators," Kliavkoff said. "I think it's more likely that we eventually get federal legislation on name, image and likeness, but we're also interested in discussing all of the harm that will come to student-athletes if they are deemed to be employees."

What exactly are the harms that will come to athletes by being deemed employees?

I doubt you actually care to know, but he's primarily referring to student-athletes in non-revenue sports. He has also said that if they are employees, they can be fired and that if it's going to be essentially a professional league, they would have to have a draft. (I didn't understand the reasoning behind needing to have a draft, other than if it's going to be professional, presumably they need to put the teams on equal footing.) There are probably more "harms" that he has mentioned, but that is all that I remember.

Another potential harm I have heard, not necessarily from Kliavkoff, is that can a university have a professional sports team and maintain a 501(c)(3) status? Will athletics then become separated from the school and will these essentially minor leagues survive?
 
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I doubt you actually care to know, but he's primarily referring to student-athletes in non-revenue sports. He has also said that if they are employees, they can be fired and that if it's going to be essentially a professional league, they would have to have a draft. (I didn't understand the reasoning behind needing to have a draft, other than if it's going to be professional, presumably they need to put the teams on equal footing.) There are probably more "harms" that he has mentioned, but that is all that I remember.

Another potential harm I have heard, not necessarily from Kliavkoff, is that can a university have a professional sports team and maintain a 501(c)(3) status? Will athletics then become separated from the school and will these essentially minor leagues survive?
To address these one-by-one:

1. There's no reason there can't be a two-track approach for athletes. Essentially, athletes can be offered two options: accept a volunteer/non-employee position that includes scholarship, room and board etc. but does not include employee status and benefits or you can accept an employee position that is going to be based largely on what sport you play and is probably going to be worth less than the value of your scholarship, unless you play a revenue sport.

2. To a certain extent they can already be fired. You can be kicked off the team for certain conduct. Really, this is the kind of concern where a players union would help. And of course you can only have one of those if you are employees.

3. There is no necessity for a draft. Professional leagues exist all over the world without one. In fact, the US is an anomaly for having a draft in its professional sports.

4. The schools already operate sports teams that employ people, often for large sums of money. They would just start employing the players in addition to the staff. As long as the whole operation remains not-for-profit there should be no danger to 501(c)(3) status.
 
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2. To a certain extent they can already be fired. You can be kicked off the team for certain conduct. Really, this is the kind of concern where a players union would help. And of course you can only have one of those if you are employees.
Hard pass
 
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1. There's no reason there can't be a two-track approach for athletes. Essentially, athletes can be offered two options: accept a volunteer/non-employee position that includes scholarship, room and board etc. but does not include employee status and benefits or you can accept an employee position that is going to be based largely on what sport you play and is probably going to be worth less than the value of your scholarship, unless you play a revenue sport.
I'm pretty sure you wouldn't be able to have a two-track approach as you describe under current law. After all, the NLRB ruling against USC and UCLA claims that the student-athletes are employees who are being paid a scholarship. Maybe that is one of the actual harms to student-athletes in non-revenue sports that they will address with lawmakers.
 
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I'm pretty sure you wouldn't be able to have a two-track approach as you describe under current law. After all, the NLRB ruling against USC and UCLA claims that the student-athletes are employees who are being paid a scholarship. Maybe that is one of the actual harms to student-athletes in non-revenue sports that they will address with lawmakers.
I assume you're referring to the NLRB memorandum from September? That issue is hardly settled and is working its way through the courts. Hypothetically, the NCAA could settle the matter with the complainants and the NLRB. I'm sure there is room for a compromise that would protect non-revenue sports, but the NCAA doesn't appear to be pursuing it. Let's face it, the NCAA's purported concern about non-revenue sports is a convenient excuse to preserve a highly lucrative status quo.
 
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Pac-12 and SEC commissioners go to Washington DC to ask for "help" with NIL policies.

Great idea. With all the significant domestic and foreign problems facing this country, let's ask congress to get involved in this mess.
 
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illini80

Forgottonia
“It’s pretty frightening because people do whatever it takes,” Littrell said. “That’s not me. I’m not going to do that. I’d rather not coach football. I’d rather not have a job.”

It’s the second part of that quote that’s the most telling to me. The honest people are going to get out.

Remember when all the NIL discussion was around the fact that now everything will be above board? Said it then and I’ll say it again: You are kidding yourself it you believe that. Cheaters are going to cheat. Doesn’t matter where you draw the line, it will be crossed. The cheaters have mostly been rewarded over the years and they are now more than ever.
 
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aiwpfan

Springfield, Il
Saban; TAMU "bought" every player on team.

So Nick, are you saying that the TAMU bag men are better than your bag men? Well, we can't have that now, can we?
 
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Jimbo Fisher says what we've all thought. Get your popcorn!


final judgment GIF
 
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Interesting read. Are booster to become the owners? Why will Universities want to cede (even more) control to the boosters? I see nothing good coming . . .


Lane Kiffin on NIL
I was at the texas basketball coaches clinic last week. Kermit Davis, head basketball coach at Ole Miss, was a speaker. Called Lane Kiffin the biggest troll in football.

Just gold.