Illini Athletics Revenue

#52      
If Petros keeps this up, we'll soon be competing as our own country in Track and Field at the Olympics. He, Brad and Mike Small are simply at a different level than the rest. You have to keep those 3 fed.
With the revenue losing sports, it will be less about results and more about, this: Demirjian (example)

You must keep the Fat Cats happy.
 
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#53      
Take a look at the signings Petros is pulling of with the women's and men's track teams. Those, along with the rumblings of a national decathalon/heptathalon training center in Champaign, will offset any monetary losses. Huge prestige for Illinois!
College level track and field is a dying sport in terms of fan interest. Illinois' recent success is being driven by an outstanding coach. It's not sustainable. Our "prestige" will fade but the losses won't.
 
#54      
College level track and field is a dying sport in terms of fan interest. Illinois' recent success is being driven by an outstanding coach. It's not sustainable. Our "prestige" will fade but the losses won't.
Outside of Oregon it has never been a huge sport in terms of fan interest, but it is also relatively low cost. My guess is you have some donors providing a lot of financial support, so not sure you gain much by dropping it
 
#55      

GrayGhost77

Centennial, CO
Outside of Oregon it has never been a huge sport in terms of fan interest, but it is also relatively low cost. My guess is you have some donors providing a lot of financial support, so not sure you gain much by dropping it
As long as the Olympics remain a political propaganda tool and a way to garner international prestige then there will be political will and money put behind supporting the Olympic sports. College sports are essentially the US's training ground for many of our Olympic athletes, so unless something dramatic changes I don't see most of these sports going away.
 
#56      
Look, the biggest over-expenditure is at the administrative level at basically every university nation wide. Asking athletics to pick up
these shortfalls while not willing to look in the mirror at costs is absurd. Keep building, keep levels of admin. at "the federal government"
levels, keep bumping up tuitions while reducing the number of families who can afford college all are killing higher ed.. this is bigger
than sports folks. in fact, primary sports (men's football and basketball) are the only thing keeping some of these schools afloat. Give
these universities a budget and make them trim the fat with layers of administration and faculty being the place to start.
 
#60      
PAC 12 looked just fine, and with a lower tv deal so ??? I guess future projections.
Ya it’s interesting. Based off of that list only you’d think the pac 12 would’ve been in a decent spot, certainly not on the brink of dissolution.

Did they exclude private schools? No usc or Notre dame, nor Miami.
 
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#65      
Look, the biggest over-expenditure is at the administrative level at basically every university nation wide. Asking athletics to pick up
these shortfalls while not willing to look in the mirror at costs is absurd. Keep building, keep levels of admin. at "the federal government"
levels, keep bumping up tuitions while reducing the number of families who can afford college all are killing higher ed.. this is bigger
than sports folks. in fact, primary sports (men's football and basketball) are the only thing keeping some of these schools afloat. Give
these universities a budget and make them trim the fat with layers of administration and faculty being the place to start.
I agree with this. Also, college course requirements (hours), many of which are totally unnecessary, serve only to insure faculty and administrative jobs. Further, a college degree, other than as training for a marketable profession such as doctor, lawyer, accountant and the like, is becoming a less reliable pathway to financial success.
 
#66      
Look, the biggest over-expenditure is at the administrative level at basically every university nation wide. Asking athletics to pick up
these shortfalls while not willing to look in the mirror at costs is absurd. Keep building, keep levels of admin. at "the federal government"
levels, keep bumping up tuitions while reducing the number of families who can afford college all are killing higher ed.. this is bigger
than sports folks. in fact, primary sports (men's football and basketball) are the only thing keeping some of these schools afloat. Give
these universities a budget and make them trim the fat with layers of administration and faculty being the place to start.
I once worked in admin at Stanford and often looked around the office wondering 'what does this person do?' I was told that after 5 years you're unofficially tenured, no matter how bad you are at your job. Also, so many schools use adjunct instructors, contractors basically, who make a pittance.
Unfortunately ballooning non-teaching staff numbers has become a problem at the el-hi level as well, where we pay much more per student than other countries for lesser outcomes.
Sports were supposed to be part of the mission of universities to produce well-rounded, broad-minded indivduals, educted in a wide range of subjects for the fullest understanding of our world. You know, to become good citizens, improve society, etc. A very quaint idea now.
 
#68      
This week the online marketplace Opendorse released its annual NIL report based on more than 150,000 transactions involving more than 100,000 athletes. Opendorse estimates that total NIL compensation will hit $1.67 billion during the 2024-25 season, up from $917 million in the first year after the rule change. Collectives, according to Opendorse, account for more than 80% of NIL compensation, with college football and men’s college basketball as the dominant sports.
On average, a men’s basketball player at a top 25 school, for instance, can expect to make about $350,000 per season from NIL, while the median NBA salary is $1.5 million. A quarterback at a top ranked college can expect about $800,000 in NIL this season and more than $1 million next, roughly in line with the median NFL salary (for all positions) of $860,000.
A women’s college player at a top 25 school, on the other hand, can make more in NIL (about $89,000) than the median WNBA salary of $78,000.
("College Athletes’ Earnings to Top $2 Billion: Business of Sports"/Bloomberg) https://biz.opendorse.com/nil-3-annual-report/
 
#69      
I've said from the beginning of NIL that this is going to be the end of college sports as we know, with the end of the line expectation being a lot of schools drop sports because they never win. I wonder if the revenue struggles mixed with the struggles to compete lead many mid-major schools to fold up shop?

I could almost see an FCS/FBS split. The top 60 or so schools go off in the professional minor league NIL direction, and everyone else goes back to a more traditional scholarship only format with student athletes.
 
#71      

This seems like a path toward further independence of the DIA from the the rest of the University. Collecting student fees gives them and the rest of the university an implied share of decision making.
 
#74      

sbillini

st petersburg, fl
This seems like a path toward further independence of the DIA from the the rest of the University. Collecting student fees gives them and the rest of the university an implied share of decision making.

I'm guessing this is just getting ahead of the pitchforks coming out when we find out how much football/basketball players will be paid directly by the DIA, and students having to partially fund it.
 
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