Illinois Hoops Recruiting Thread (Week of May 17th, 2021)

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#202      
I respectfully disagree. I think his point is playing time for them is going to be hard to come by. Maybe one of them gets significant minutes but with the addition of Plummer and Hutchinson as well as Trent and Damonte being back when exactly are they going to be on the court?

1 = AC
2 = TF
3 = Hutch/Damonte
4 = Grandison/Hawkins/Gueirrer (if he comes) Payne (If Kofi comes back)
5 = Kofi/Payne

Then you got Plummer coming off the bench so where are the minutes for the 2021 class exactly? I think that was his point. If PODZ or any of them don't play much they might look to go to the portal next year.
I think with the transfer rules being what they are, staffs just have to go into this knowing players are going to leave. You put your most productive players on the court, and if less productive players are unhappy, you lose them.
 
#207      
The desert

One year is a pretty small sample size. Show me the data over multiple years. I also think you have to account for outliers like Kentucky and Kansas and Duke in a conference, because they don't reflect the conference as a whole. It would be a far more useful exercise to compare median NBA draft picks per team rather than total per conference. The conclusion may end up being the same, but at least it would be a valid conclusion.

But then again, I don't expect much in the way of critical thinking out of a bunch of SEC shills.
 
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#209      
DC Area
One year is a pretty small sample size. Show me the data over multiple years. I also think you have to account for outliers like Kentucky and Kansas and Duke in a conference, because they don't reflect the conference as a whole. It would be a far more useful exercise to compare median NBA draft picks per team rather than total per conference.

Its just a recruiting pitch. The SEC has gottne better recently due to much better coaches in conference but ACC and old Big East is probably going to look better over mutliple year even with the KU years.

The part I think is odd is the assumption that the big 10 struggles in the tourney. I don't think that is true despite few championships.
 
#210      
BU:1 Trash cans:0
Chicago
The part I think is odd is the assumption that the big 10 struggles in the tourney. I don't think that is true despite few championships.
It looks to me like they are using numbers from the 2020 draft to try to explain the B1G struggles in the 2021 tourney. I agree with sacraig that the sample sizes utilized are very small and the connection between tournament results and the previous draft is tenuous at best.

Seems like little more than shilling for the SEC.
 
#212      
Chevy Chase, Maryland
One year is a pretty small sample size. Show me the data over multiple years. I also think you have to account for outliers like Kentucky and Kansas and Duke in a conference, because they don't reflect the conference as a whole. It would be a far more useful exercise to compare median NBA draft picks per team rather than total per conference. The conclusion may end up being the same, but at least it would be a valid conclusion.

But then again, I don't expect much in the way of critical thinking out of a bunch of SEC shills.
Well said. Tangentially, I recall the anecdote (from stats class long ago) about how the University of Virginia College of Communications marketed in the mid-'80s to prospective students that the department boasted an outrageously high average starting salary for graduates.

Turned out that Ralph Sampson was a member of the class from which that stat was derived.
 
#214      
It looks to me like they are using numbers from the 2020 draft to try to explain the B1G struggles in the 2021 tourney. I agree with sacraig that the sample sizes utilized are very small and the connection between tournament results and the previous draft is tenuous at best.

Seems like little more than shilling for the SEC.
It is shilling, but there are 42 former Big Ten players in the NBA, compared to 74 SEC players.
 
#215      
The desert
It is shilling, but there are 42 former Big Ten players in the NBA, compared to 74 SEC players.

Right. This is a more useful stat, though I'd still argue that there needs to be an effort to control for the outsize weight of the blue bloods. They are outliers and don't represent overall conference strength. The lack of one in the B1G skews these results (though I imagine the conclusion probably ends up more or less the same, just to a lesser degree).
 
#217      
Well said. Tangentially, I recall the anecdote (from stats class long ago) about how the University of Virginia College of Communications marketed in the mid-'80s to prospective students that the department boasted an outrageously high average starting salary for graduates.

Turned out that Ralph Sampson was a member of the class from which that stat was derived
Quite the expensive lesson for those kids to learn about medians
 
#218      
Right. This is a more useful stat, though I'd still argue that there needs to be an effort to control for the outsize weight of the blue bloods. They are outliers and don't represent overall conference strength. The lack of one in the B1G skews these results (though I imagine the conclusion probably ends up more or less the same, just to a lesser degree).
PAC 12 has 69 former players in the NBA. ACC has 85. Even Big 12 has 45. It's fair to say that former Big Ten players aren't over-represented in the NBA.
 
#219      
One year is a pretty small sample size. Show me the data over multiple years. I also think you have to account for outliers like Kentucky and Kansas and Duke in a conference, because they don't reflect the conference as a whole. It would be a far more useful exercise to compare median NBA draft picks per team rather than total per conference. The conclusion may end up being the same, but at least it would be a valid conclusion.

But then again, I don't expect much in the way of critical thinking out of a bunch of SEC shills.
I had some time to kill so I added each school's draft picks from 2014 to 2020 (IIRC 2014 was last major conference realignment)

PAC 12 median: 4 (USC & Colorado)
ACC median: 3 (Notre Dame)
Big 12 median: 3 (Oklahoma St/Texas Tech/Oklahoma)
Big 10 median: 2 (Iowa/OSU/Wisconsin)
SEC median: 2 (Alabama/Miznoz/Georgia/Auburn)
 
#220      
That is so odd to me
Assuming he’s still a good shooter why wouldn’t anyone want 1 year of a veteran shooter off the bench if you have an open spot?
 
#221      
The desert
I had some time to kill so I added each school's draft picks from 2014 to 2020 (IIRC 2014 was last major conference realignment)

PAC 12 median: 4 (USC & Colorado)
ACC median: 3 (Notre Dame)
Big 12 median: 3 (Oklahoma St/Texas Tech/Oklahoma)
Big 10 median: 2 (Iowa/OSU/Wisconsin)
SEC median: 2 (Alabama/Miznoz/Georgia/Auburn)

What are the schools in parentheses?
 
#222      
PAC 12 has 69 former players in the NBA. ACC has 85. Even Big 12 has 45. It's fair to say that former Big Ten players aren't over-represented in the NBA.

The Big Ten creates good teams by developing their guys and getting older. This serves you well over the course of a long season when you can be more consistent.

In a one game situation (like the tournament), elite talent can take over a game.
 
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