NIL Thread (Name, Image, Likeness Rule)

#2      

illini80

Forgottonia
Interesting comments (to me at least) from Joe Henricksen on Saturday Sports Talk with Tate and Kelly yesterday, regarding NIL and recruiting. Joe talks around things and won’t come out and say it directly, but there is crazy stuff happening. High majors are partnering with mid majors to develop players for them (think JC) if they don’t have roster spots for them now. Some MM’s are happy to do it because they can’t compete recruiting otherwise. NIL has no rules, at least that are being followed, and last minute “deals” are happening all over the place where schools with money come in last minute with cash to grab players who already had lessor deals set up. It’s easier to be a great recruiter if you have the cash to offer. There’s really too much to unpack in a post, but worth a listen if you like Joe. The idea that NIL levels the playing field is the complete opposite of what’s happening. Thankfully, Illinois was ahead of the curve and is in a great spot.

 
#3      

sacraig

The desert
Interesting comments (to me at least) from Joe Henricksen on Saturday Sports Talk with Tate and Kelly yesterday, regarding NIL and recruiting. Joe talks around things and won’t come out and say it directly, but there is crazy stuff happening. High majors are partnering with mid majors to develop players for them (think JC) if they don’t have roster spots for them now. Some MM’s are happy to do it because they can’t compete recruiting otherwise. NIL has no rules, at least that are being followed, and last minute “deals” are happening all over the place where schools with money come in last minute with cash to grab players who already had lessor deals set up. It’s easier to be a great recruiter if you have the cash to offer. There’s really too much to unpack in a post, but worth a listen if you like Joe. The idea that NIL levels the playing field is the complete opposite of what’s happening. Thankfully, Illinois was ahead of the curve and is in a great spot.

NIL only levels the playing field near the top. It simultaneously further stratified the playing field when comparing major conferences to mid-majors.
 
#4      
Interesting comments (to me at least) from Joe Henricksen on Saturday Sports Talk with Tate and Kelly yesterday, regarding NIL and recruiting. Joe talks around things and won’t come out and say it directly, but there is crazy stuff happening. High majors are partnering with mid majors to develop players for them (think JC) if they don’t have roster spots for them now. Some MM’s are happy to do it because they can’t compete recruiting otherwise. NIL has no rules, at least that are being followed, and last minute “deals” are happening all over the place where schools with money come in last minute with cash to grab players who already had lessor deals set up. It’s easier to be a great recruiter if you have the cash to offer. There’s really too much to unpack in a post, but worth a listen if you like Joe. The idea that NIL levels the playing field is the complete opposite of what’s happening. Thankfully, Illinois was ahead of the curve and is in a great spot.


On behalf of Saluki Nation I volunteer SIU as Brad's feeder program.
 
#6      
NIL is reshaping college basketball as we know it, and I'm not convinced it's for the better.
Power in the workers(players) hands is definitely for the better in my book. Fat cats making money off their work by doing nothing is while the players get absolutely no slice of the pie is the only other option we’ve ever been presented.
 
#7      

derrick6

Illini Dawg
Seattle
NIL is reshaping college basketball as we know it, and I'm not convinced it's for the better.
The transfer rules is the bigger effect, imo, but that will change May 1st, so let’s see if things settle down after that (next year).

Transfer rules have forced coaches to think very short term and players to be impatient.

NIL is a reflection of paying for something short term versus long term. Things cost more for a 1 year commitment than multiple years.
 
#8      

WingedWarriors

Leesburg, FL
Interesting comments (to me at least) from Joe Henricksen on Saturday Sports Talk with Tate and Kelly yesterday, regarding NIL and recruiting. Joe talks around things and won’t come out and say it directly, but there is crazy stuff happening. High majors are partnering with mid majors to develop players for them (think JC) if they don’t have roster spots for them now. Some MM’s are happy to do it because they can’t compete recruiting otherwise. NIL has no rules, at least that are being followed, and last minute “deals” are happening all over the place where schools with money come in last minute with cash to grab players who already had lessor deals set up. It’s easier to be a great recruiter if you have the cash to offer. There’s really too much to unpack in a post, but worth a listen if you like Joe. The idea that NIL levels the playing field is the complete opposite of what’s happening. Thankfully, Illinois was ahead of the curve and is in a great spot.

NIL is very complicated because the Supreme Court has even got involved. Name, Image, Likeness is a great concept, but there's always a loophole: and big money has found it.
 
#9      

illini80

Forgottonia
NIL only levels the playing field near the top. It simultaneously further stratified the playing field when comparing major conferences to mid-majors.
I believe even at the top there will be clear layers. Time will tell. You are correct in that some schools that wouldn’t play the game under the table are happy to be involved now. We are fortunate to be in the B10 with a lucrative TV contract to fund the AD and use donor money to bolster NIL.
 
#10      
Power in the workers(players) hands is definitely for the better in my book. Fat cats making money off their work by doing nothing is while the players get absolutely no slice of the pie is the only other option we’ve ever been presented.
I think most would agree with you. The surprising part about NIL, and I would argue the primary issue, is how hands-on schools have been. NIL was sold as something student-athletes could do to make money off of what they do but outside the umbrella of the school. Instead schools are very actively involved and using it to guarantee a certain amount of income. I have absolutely no issue with the amount of money some of these athletes are bringing in, but we should also stop kidding ourselves that this is really NIL. When a school says 'come back instead of going to the NBA and we'll get you $2 million' or 'come here where we've got this deal to get you $800K over two years', we're no longer in the territory of athletes marketing themselves for income. It may "technically" be that, but it's really just contracts through a middleman.
 
#11      

Chuck Nuggets

The Honorable Chuck Nuggets
Power in the workers(players) hands is definitely for the better in my book. Fat cats making money off their work by doing nothing is while the players get absolutely no slice of the pie is the only other option we’ve ever been presented.
In the interest of maintaining the intent of this thread I'll just state I have read your response.
 
#15      

Future Walk-On

Peoria, IL
I will say. When NIL was announced I was expecting like part time job money for every kid and bump ups for the super stars. Not massive 6+ figure money. One argument was they didn't have time with school and practice to earn money elsewhere which is true.

Most schools have 0 kids making anything off NIL.

Can't deny kids money if there are ways for them to earn it. I just worry about the damage it could cause to "teams"
 
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#16      
I will say. When NIL was announced I was expecting like part time job money for every kid, not 6+ figures for some kids. One argument was they didn't have time with school and practice to earn money elsewhere which is true.

Most schools have 0 kids making anything off NIL.

Can't deny kids money if there are ways for them to earn it. I just worry about the damage it could cause to "teams"
There’s a lot of stuff to shake out but we do have the regular adult workplace to look at and some make a killing while others don’t there too and it functions.
 
#18      
Power in the workers(players) hands is definitely for the better in my book. Fat cats making money off their work by doing nothing is while the players get absolutely no slice of the pie is the only other option we’ve ever been presented.

Agree! Wouldn't necessarily say the coaches, administrators, and athletic directors are doing nothing, but they have received way too much of they money produced by college basketball.
 
#19      
I will say. When NIL was announced I was expecting like part time job money for every kid and bump ups for the super stars. Not massive 6+ figure money. One argument was they didn't have time with school and practice to earn money elsewhere which is true.
Does a good job showing how much value star players have to teams/schools. If the rumors about Kofi bringing in close to $1 mil are true, that's about 1/4 of what BU brings in. Similar ratio for Oscar at UK this upcoming year. No doubt that Christian Laettner had this same (or higher) relative value to Duke and Coach K back in the day, he just didn't get to see any of that value. Clearly making lots of money off the court didn't impact Kofi or Oscar's performance on the court.
Most schools have 0 kids making anything off NIL.
Where are you getting this? This might be what you'd think to be the case but there's no data out there to validate whether this is true or not. People just assume non-star players can't benefit from NIL in at least some way, but we don't know that or to what degree that's the case. Exhibit A: Connor Serven has his own NIL deal with a national company. Now, he's on a high-profile team at a big institution, but just because a school is smaller or lower-level doesn't mean there are no opportunity for athletes to make money off NIL.
 
#21      
Agree! Wouldn't necessarily say the coaches, administrators, and athletic directors are doing nothing, but they have received way too much of they money produced by college basketball.
I don't blame anyone for getting what they can get. This is America and clearly they are being paid a rate set by the market. Now the players weren't but we are the ones playing for the tickets, streaming tv, ads, and merchandise. Is it getting crazy for sure but as long as we are slapping done several $100 bills to go to a game ir venue then it will only get worse. My wife just switched to Fubotv to watch her darn cubs.
 
#22      
Second, the players are bringing in a ton of money for the program, but NIL is not the program paying them back. NIL has no impact on the school making money to fund other sports.
I think this remains to be seen. It's entirely possible that diversions of donor dollars to NIL will reduce their donations to the DIA. In fact, Whitman specifically talked about this.
 
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#23      
One change I would like to see is something akin to the college baseball situation. You make a choice and then the first two years you're locked in unless there's a coaching change. I think this would settle things down and might actually reduce a bit of the NIL insanity.

I also wonder about the legality of having kids report their NIL to the NCAA so that coaches can know what they have gotten. It wouldn't have to be publicly released (hard to prevent, I know), but it would prevent some of the gamesmanship that is probably happening. Inflated promises, kids telling one school they've had an offer that didn't exist, etc. When we compare the situation with the pros, every GM knows what other players are making. That transparency does a lot to make the system more navigable for those running it.
 
#24      
With the new transfer rules and the effect of NIL, has NCAA Men's BB ever evolved more rapidly?

It will be a while before things shake out and we see what the new college athletics looks like.

With the SCOTUS ruling on NCAA vs Alston schools can already pay athletes for "educational" expenses up to $5900 per year. UIUC has announced that they will be paying the max to ALL athletes. That includes non-scholarship. Considering ~350 athletes, that's not a insignificant chunk out of DIA budget. SCOTUS left it open that payment might not be limited to educational expense in the future. NLRB has already said they will consider college athletes as employees. Play for pay is on the way.

When that happens, what effect will there be on NIL? Will we see something like pro sports where essentially everyone on a team has some sort of deals going on but they will range from $$$ down to cents. Smaller schools unable to pay high "salaries" might be able to make it up in NIL if they have big donors.

I think the transfer portal will settle down once a big enough number of players have used their one-time free move, but who knows.

Hold onto your butts. Gonna be a wild ride.
 
#25      
One change I would like to see is something akin to the college baseball situation. You make a choice and then the first two years you're locked in unless there's a coaching change. I think this would settle things down and might actually reduce a bit of the NIL insanity.

I also wonder about the legality of having kids report their NIL to the NCAA so that coaches can know what they have gotten. It wouldn't have to be publicly released (hard to prevent, I know), but it would prevent some of the gamesmanship that is probably happening. Inflated promises, kids telling one school they've had an offer that didn't exist, etc. When we compare the situation with the pros, every GM knows what other players are making. That transparency does a lot to make the system more navigable for those running it.

Question, and I truly don't know the answer. Do GM's know what other players make in endorsement $$? That's what NIL is essentially.