NIL Thread (Name, Image, Likeness Rule)

#27      
#28      
Oh boo hoo! 😭

Multi-millionaire grown men will quit because their jobs got harder? Oh no!! Where will we ever find people to fill those high paying opportunities? Give me a break!

And Gen Z is accused of quiet quitting?
It’s not that the job got harder… it’s that the nature of the institutional sport they know has fundamentally changed in a way they can no longer support.

And… it’s not a good idea to stereotype whole generations of people 😉
 
#29      
It’s not that the job got harder… it’s that the nature of the institutional sport they know has fundamentally changed in a way they can no longer support.

And… it’s not a good idea to stereotype whole generations of people 😉

The article clearly states that dealing with the portal and NIL is adding to coaches’ “already demanding workload,” and the Baylor AD fears that will drive many of them away.

And again, these are well-compensated grown-ups. If they are put off by the fundamental changes of players having the same freedom of movement that they do while also earning fair compensation, then perhaps it IS time for them to ride off into the sunset. Adapt or die. There will be no shortage of newcomers ready to come in and navigate this new landscape.
 
#30      

sacraig

The desert
It’s not that the job got harder… it’s that the nature of the institutional sport they know has fundamentally changed in a way they can no longer support.

And… it’s not a good idea to stereotype whole generations of people 😉
This is Baylor so he's absolutely whining about protecting millionaires, not the integrity of the sport.

And if they can't support it anymore, I'm sure they can retire happy and wealthy and 1000 more people would happily do the job for half their salary.
 
#31      
This is Baylor so he's absolutely whining about protecting millionaires, not the integrity of the sport.

And if they can't support it anymore, I'm sure they can retire happy and wealthy and 1000 more people would happily do the job for half their salary.
Yeah, … my comments were geared more toward the last paragraph in the article.
 
#32      
Thought this was an interesting read: NCAA may pay for past sins.

TLDR, the NCAA got slammed when losing on NIL, so there is now a case moving along asking for class action status to recover damages going back to 2016. Thery're claiming $1.4 billion, with 75% going to football players, 15% to men's bball. Shockingly, the NCAA says they're wrong.
 
#33      
Thought this was an interesting read: NCAA may pay for past sins.

TLDR, the NCAA got slammed when losing on NIL, so there is now a case moving along asking for class action status to recover damages going back to 2016. Thery're claiming $1.4 billion, with 75% going to football players, 15% to men's bball. Shockingly, the NCAA says they're wrong.
One small correction - a class action suit means 80% goes to the lawyers, 15% to football players, 3% to basketball, 2% to everyone else.
 
#34      
I don't mind the NIL rule of the portal isn't what it is. If guys want to get paid and can get paid, hey, more power to them. Has it gotten out of control? Absolutely.

However, what really has thrown the whole system for a loop is not having to sit a year when transferring. It's free agency every year. It allows guys to basically quit with no repercussions, it makes high school recruiting secondary because why develop a freshman when he can leave after a year vs grabbing an experienced senior who can step right in? The mid majors have become a farm system.

The remedy for this is to 1) eliminate the one and done rule. If a kid wants to go to the NBA and make money right out of High School, then fine, go get paid and 2)bring back the mandatory rule that you have to sit out a year if you want to transfer. If you make a decision, you stick with it. The NCAA rewarded Skyy for quiting on his team mid season. If he wants to do that, fine, but you sit out a year.

What this has created is a distrust by the coaches because they have to assume that no player is guaranteed to return. There's no rules for the player, thus the coaches have to prepare for that. When I see people comment about guys getting recruited over and worrying about them leaving then blame the coach. I cringe. Look what happened to BU this year. His freshmen backcourt just left and he's caught scrambling with no guards. He can't wait until May hoping things work out because if you wait, you're screwed. There's no loyalty on either side right now because not requiring guys to stay at least one year has created a complete distrust on both ends.

1)Give them their money, 2)give them the opportunity to go pro right out of HS and 3)require two years at a school or sit our a year. Problem solved.
 
#35      
One small correction - a class action suit means 80% goes to the lawyers, 15% to football players, 3% to basketball, 2% to everyone else.
Sad but still better than 100% to a bunch of people who stumbled their way to the finish line and contributed very little
 
#36      

chrisRunner7

Spokane, WA
Sad but still better than 100% to a bunch of people who stumbled their way to the finish line and contributed very little
Well, the original post was an exaggeration/mischaracterization of class action lawsuits... no lawyers are taking 80% of 1.4 billion if they win that case. But if he wants to say lawyers suck, sure, I get it.
 
#37      
Well, the original post was an exaggeration/mischaracterization of class action lawsuits... no lawyers are taking 80% of 1.4 billion if they win that case. But if he wants to say lawyers suck, sure, I get it.
Plaintiffs’ lawyers, that is. But in any case, no court would approve more than 35%. And an antitrust claim like this would treble the damage award.

But back to your regularly scheduled grumbling about lawyers…
 
#38      
Plaintiffs’ lawyers, that is. But in any case, no court would approve more than 35%. And an antitrust claim like this would treble the damage award.

But back to your regularly scheduled grumbling about lawyers…
OK - I'll rephrase. You are arithmetically correct on the 35%. The point I was trying to make is that in a class action case, the losing or settling defendant writes a monster check. The plaintiff lawyers get massive, big honking checks. The lead plaintiff will get a noticeable check. The thousands of class members will get very tiny checks. In my personal experience, class action suits are not an effective means to proportionally compensate large numbers of individuals wronged by a large institution. They are more a means to generate large profits for the plaintiffs lawyers and to seek revenge and retribution through damaging or destroying the institution.
 
#39      

Mr. Tibbs

southeast DuPage
lets put it this way

if you are anything other than a plaintiff in a personal injury case or a real estate closing today, your effed if you need to hire an attorney, in which case you have already lost
 
#40      

DReq

Always Illini
Central Illinois
OK - I'll rephrase. You are arithmetically correct on the 35%. The point I was trying to make is that in a class action case, the losing or settling defendant writes a monster check. The plaintiff lawyers get massive, big honking checks. The lead plaintiff will get a noticeable check. The thousands of class members will get very tiny checks. In my personal experience, class action suits are not an effective means to proportionally compensate large numbers of individuals wronged by a large institution. They are more a means to generate large profits for the plaintiffs lawyers and to seek revenge and retribution through damaging or destroying the institution.
If you know what a class action is for then you know that this is exactly why they work. A large business can cause a tiny amount of damage to each of a million people and by doing so turn a big profit. No single claimant can pursue that claim. Even if that person self-represents in small claims court for their $50 or whatever damage they could prove. Class action is not for people who have actually lost huge amounts and never were for that purpose. If you have lost a large sum you can afford to pursue that claim as an individual.

The only reason business is held accountable for small injuries to large numbers of people is through class action and the lawyers who make those stick have generated huge sums at a huge cost. It is not some magical trick but an enormous effort getting a class certified by a court.

I know to those who have not actually pursued a class action it looks like easy money but it is not and the injured plaintiffs would never recover their money on their own.

I also cannot let stand the claim that is you hire an attorney in a real estate transaction you are "effed" as was stated by the OP is dangerous. Far more people are financially ruined every year by not hiring an attorney when they need to than are by hiring an attorney.

I know this is not a popular statement but I can say I am a reformed attorney having gone through rehab and returned to non-attorney life. I have plenty or bad to say bout the profession but telling people not to get attorneys when they need them is dangerous and irresponsible to create a false narrative about what happens in a lawyer client relationship. There are bad attorneys. There are bad people in all professions and occupations. That does not mean everyone in that occupation or profession is bad. That sort of blanket statement is simply ill-advised and wrong.

I will step off my soapbox. Please feel free to cast your stones. I will ignore them.
 
#41      
If you know what a class action is for then you know that this is exactly why they work. A large business can cause a tiny amount of damage to each of a million people and by doing so turn a big profit. No single claimant can pursue that claim. Even if that person self-represents in small claims court for their $50 or whatever damage they could prove. Class action is not for people who have actually lost huge amounts and never were for that purpose. If you have lost a large sum you can afford to pursue that claim as an individual.

The only reason business is held accountable for small injuries to large numbers of people is through class action and the lawyers who make those stick have generated huge sums at a huge cost. It is not some magical trick but an enormous effort getting a class certified by a court.

I know to those who have not actually pursued a class action it looks like easy money but it is not and the injured plaintiffs would never recover their money on their own.

I also cannot let stand the claim that is you hire an attorney in a real estate transaction you are "effed" as was stated by the OP is dangerous. Far more people are financially ruined every year by not hiring an attorney when they need to than are by hiring an attorney.

I know this is not a popular statement but I can say I am a reformed attorney having gone through rehab and returned to non-attorney life. I have plenty or bad to say bout the profession but telling people not to get attorneys when they need them is dangerous and irresponsible to create a false narrative about what happens in a lawyer client relationship. There are bad attorneys. There are bad people in all professions and occupations. That does not mean everyone in that occupation or profession is bad. That sort of blanket statement is simply ill-advised and wrong.

I will step off my soapbox. Please feel free to cast your stones. I will ignore them.
No argument against your points. My reply was in reference to discussion about a class action suit against the NCAA to recover perceived damages for pre-NIL nonpayment of athletes, which seems to align with your 3rd sentence - the definition of what class action suits are not for.

I'm finished now.