NCAA allows on-field corporate sponsorships

#1      

SuperMetroid

Evanston
NCAA officials mulling change to allow on field corporate sponsorships

"Within the NCAA’s government structure, officials are seriously considering legislative changes to permit schools to display corporate logos on their football fields. While more debate is expected next month within the NCAA playing rules oversight committee, administrators expect a resolution that opens the door for on-field sponsorships — and, perhaps eventually, corporate patches on player jerseys."

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#2      

redwingillini11

White and Sixth
North Aurora
NCAA officials mulling change to allow on field corporate sponsorships

"Within the NCAA’s government structure, officials are seriously considering legislative changes to permit schools to display corporate logos on their football fields. While more debate is expected next month within the NCAA playing rules oversight committee, administrators expect a resolution that opens the door for on-field sponsorships — and, perhaps eventually, corporate patches on player jerseys."

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Would be a very disgusting thing to have to come to terms with.
 
#9      

FlyNavy

Los Angeles
Yeah, of all the things that could ruin college athletics this is like 20th on the list.
I agree with this. Corporate patches are already a part of every bowl game (see below). And if you want to split hairs, the Nike logo is also a corporate representation on the uniform.

Now if they go full-soccer on us and replace the "I" on the helmet with a State Farm logo, then we can make the argument on this ruining college athletics...

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#12      

Mr. Tibbs

southeast DuPage
I find it a little disingenuous when people complain about the pursuit of wealth. With all it's warts, it is still the driving force that enables us to live in the comfort we have grown accustom to.
it’s not so much the pursuit of wealth , it’s when it’s done at the expense of other virtues , that it becomes a problem

as the good book says, “ it’s easier for a rich man to pass thru the eye of a needle than for him to enter the gates of heaven”
 
#13      
I find it a little disingenuous when people complain about the pursuit of wealth. With all it's warts, it is still the driving force that enables us to live in the comfort we have grown accustom to.
There’s a difference between the “pursuit of wealth” and the “love of money”. Industrious work and entrepreneurship are, as you point out, virtuous aspects of a healthy society and economy. The problems occur with metastasis into an unbalanced love of money itself, putting riches above people and relationships. Too much of most good things has the potential to become harmful. Appreciate good food and drink but don’t become gluttonous or a drunk, for example.

Do college sports really need commercial sponsorship to thrive or is this just about hauling in more money. Looking at coaching/staff salaries, player salaries, and facilities, I’m not sensing a lack of money. How much then is enough? Are we approaching the point where more, more, more becomes harmful? NIL and coach salary caps would dampen the drive for more money. Then the transfer portal would be used more to find a better fit than to land a bigger paycheck. Maybe one capped pool for NIL and another for coaching salaries? That could level the playing field and dampen the relentless drive for more money.
 
#14      
I find it a little disingenuous when people complain about the pursuit of wealth. With all it's warts, it is still the driving force that enables us to live in the comfort we have grown accustom to.
The pursuit of wealth is not the only force that drives a decent society, and it shouldn't trump all others.

And greed can be self-defeating, especially when your focus becomes squeezing as much cash out as fast as possible. You wind up killing the goose that lays the golden eggs because you want all the gold right now.

College sports is a great tradition and it can be a nice little money spinner too. But you have to let it thrive on its own terms. It's not there solely for marketers and administrators to make a quick buck.
 
#15      

Mr. Tibbs

southeast DuPage
sadly, it looks like current money is getting in the way of 130 years of tradition
 
#16      
If this was turned into another way to fund NIL with the settlement ruling that could be fine. Some schools and (conferences) would be worth more advertising dollars than others based on TV viewership.
 
#17      
it’s not so much the pursuit of wealth , it’s when it’s done at the expense of other virtues , that it becomes a problem

as the good book says, “ it’s easier for a rich man to pass thru the eye of a needle than for him to enter the gates of heaven”
Of course it is. Rich guys can afford really big needles.
 
#18      
It was just a matter of time, folks. Some colleges already have corporate logos on their fields. I can't recall all who do right now, but an example is Oregon State, which has "Reser" prominently displayed on their field. I know they are the sponsor of their stadium but what's the difference? Someone already brought up the bowl game patches and Nike, Addidas, Under Armour logos. Its already prominent in Pro sports with logos on uniforms (NBA, MLB) and helmets (NHL). Given the direction of college sports, you knew it was coming. College sports is not "amateur" athletics any longer...there is no more "tradition"...at least not at the D-1 level. Sad but that's the reality.
 
#19      

TentakilRex

Land O Insects between Quincy-Macomb-Jacksonville
I find it a little disingenuous when people complain about the pursuit of wealth. With all it's warts, it is still the driving force that enables us to live in the comfort we have grown accustom to.
True but I am much less likely to buy jerseys with an advertising patch on them (I go out of my way to get soccer jerseys without ads)

Also there is always a possibility of blowback if a company isn't that good, see Enron Field.
 
#21      
It was just a matter of time, folks. Some colleges already have corporate logos on their fields. I can't recall all who do right now, but an example is Oregon State, which has "Reser" prominently displayed on their field. I know they are the sponsor of their stadium but what's the difference? Someone already brought up the bowl game patches and Nike, Addidas, Under Armour logos. Its already prominent in Pro sports with logos on uniforms (NBA, MLB) and helmets (NHL). Given the direction of college sports, you knew it was coming. College sports is not "amateur" athletics any longer...there is no more "tradition"...at least not at the D-1 level. Sad but that's the reality.
Years back, Mrs. Illiniguy74 and I attended a football game at Louisville in Papa John's Stadium. We were both surprised by the name.
 
#22      

Mr. Tibbs

southeast DuPage
Years back, Mrs. Illiniguy74 and I attended a football game at Louisville in Papa John's Stadium. We were both surprised by the name.
I’m 99% sure That Stadium is not owned by the university there . It’s part of the exposition property complex there with the old baseball park & old indoor arena - which may have finally been demolished
 
#23      

splitter

and not Nebraska
I agree with this. Corporate patches are already a part of every bowl game (see below). And if you want to split hairs, the Nike logo is also a corporate representation on the uniform.

Now if they go full-soccer on us and replace the "I" on the helmet with a State Farm logo, then we can make the argument on this ruining college athletics...

View attachment 35097
Strike A Pose Smile GIF by Formula 1
could get worse but Carlos does look good
 
#24      
the NCAA is powerless and on their way out the door. every decision is challenged in court.
 
#25      
I’m 99% sure That Stadium is not owned by the university there . It’s part of the exposition property complex there with the old baseball park & old indoor arena - which may have finally been demolished

The old Louisville stadium is part of the exposition property complex. The current stadium (previously known as Papa John's Stadium and now known as L&N Federal Credit Union Stadium) is on the southern end of the Louisville campus.
 
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