St. Louis Cardinals 2022

#576      
I think it was a good pitch, and they were right to play in against a weak hitter, but this is baseball. Sometimes a bad hitter, against all odds, manages to square up a good pitch in a tough location. Just goes to show that a no-no requires both tons of skill and tons of luck.
Just 1/16th of an inch on the bat and it would be a different story today.
 
#577      

pruman91

Paducah, Ky

Rick Hummel
The expectations were considerable surrounding Jack Flaherty’s first start at Busch Stadium since last Aug. 24, and first overall in the majors since Sept. 24 The reality was a mixed bag.
Flaherty gave up four runs in three innings Wednesday night and clearly was far from midseason form after healing from a long bout with shoulder bursitis. But the Pirates, because of some shoddy fielding by the Cardinals — including by Flaherty himself — shouldn’t have scored any of those runs in what ultimately was their 6-4 victory that didn’t involve Flaherty in the decision.
The Pirates, salvaging one game of a four-game series, scored twice each in the first and second innings. But in the first, with runners at first and third, rookie first baseman Brendan Donovan, fielding what should have been a double play ball by slow-running Daniel Vogelbach, could only knock it down for the out at first as a run scored from third. Cal Mitchell’s single scored another run.

In the second, Flaherty and catcher Yadier Molina both threw the ball away at first base after fielding bunt attempts and two runs scored without the ball leaving the infield except for the Cardinals throwing it out of the infield.
Flaherty, who walked two, hit one and fanned three, closed on a high note, recording three ground-ball outs in the third, reaching his prescribed limit of 60 pitches, before right-hander Johan Oviedo entered in the fourth.
 
#578      

pruman91

Paducah, Ky

Benjamin Hochman
Paul Goldschmidt is hitting like Arizona Paul Goldschmidt, which is to say, he’s hitting like the star of Nolan Gorman’s childhood.
“And now I get to see it firsthand,” said Gorman, a Phoenix native. “It’s pretty cool.”
Cardinals second baseman Gorman was born in 2000, so he was 11 when the Cardinals first baseman made his 2011 Diamondbacks debut. By 2013, when Gorman was 13, Goldschmidt finished second in the MVP voting. “Goldy” would finish second again, as well as third and sixth, during Gorman’s teenage years.
Now, clearly Goldschmidt has had some good campaigns in St. Louis, but this?

Goldschmidt entered Wednesday atop the National League in every “slash” category — batting average (.349), on-base percentage (.431), slugging percentage (.642) and, thus, OPS (1.073). He entered Wednesday’s home game against Pittsburgh with four homers in his past three games. On Tuesday, he had the best statistical doubleheader for the Cardinals since Mark Whiten’s famous night in Cincinnati. His 2022 is something straight out of Gorman’s childhood.
“Everybody knew who he was, especially all the baseball players I came up with,” said Gorman, the Cardinals’ slugging rookie. “Everybody just looked up to him and how he played the game — and how he was off the field, as well.”
 
#580      

pruman91

Paducah, Ky

Rick Hummel
The Cardinals will go into Boston’s Fenway Park as a first-place team for the first time since the 2013 World Series when they start a series with the Red Sox Friday night. Oliver Marmol’s team took over first place in the National League Central Division on the just-completed 5-2 homestand as Milwaukee faltered.
On Friday night, Adam Wainwright, who suffered two losses in that World Series, the only one in which he has started a game and a Series he laments, will match up against longtime teammate Michael Wacha. The Cardinals are the only team Wacha (4-1) hasn’t faced.
Wacha, as a rookie, was the hero of that 2013 postseason run, winning four postseason games, with one of those a Game 2 win in the Series at Boston before he lost Game 6 there. Wainwright was the loser in Game 5 in St. Louis, as well as Game 1 in Boston.

This will be the 34th major-league stadium, including Monterrey, Mexico, in which Wainwright will have pitched a major league regular-season game although he did beat the Red Sox at Busch Stadium in 2014.
“That’s pretty neat,” said Wainwright, about officially adding Fenway to the list. “I’m excited to go there although I’ve been there. I’m excited to pitch against a great team in a really cool venue but ... I’ve seen it, so it’s not going to be totally different.”
More exciting, he said, will be the “Old Man Walk,” he takes in a city/stadium the day after he pitches. “That’s going to be worth its weight in gold for me,” Wainwright said. “(Fenway) is a park I have not ventured through yet.”
 
#582      

Rick Hummel
The Cardinals will go into Boston’s Fenway Park as a first-place team for the first time since the 2013 World Series when they start a series with the Red Sox Friday night. Oliver Marmol’s team took over first place in the National League Central Division on the just-completed 5-2 homestand as Milwaukee faltered.
On Friday night, Adam Wainwright, who suffered two losses in that World Series, the only one in which he has started a game and a Series he laments, will match up against longtime teammate Michael Wacha. The Cardinals are the only team Wacha (4-1) hasn’t faced.
Wacha, as a rookie, was the hero of that 2013 postseason run, winning four postseason games, with one of those a Game 2 win in the Series at Boston before he lost Game 6 there. Wainwright was the loser in Game 5 in St. Louis, as well as Game 1 in Boston.

This will be the 34th major-league stadium, including Monterrey, Mexico, in which Wainwright will have pitched a major league regular-season game although he did beat the Red Sox at Busch Stadium in 2014.
“That’s pretty neat,” said Wainwright, about officially adding Fenway to the list. “I’m excited to go there although I’ve been there. I’m excited to pitch against a great team in a really cool venue but ... I’ve seen it, so it’s not going to be totally different.”
More exciting, he said, will be the “Old Man Walk,” he takes in a city/stadium the day after he pitches. “That’s going to be worth its weight in gold for me,” Wainwright said. “(Fenway) is a park I have not ventured through yet.”
My son and I went to Fenway last time the Cards played in Boston. It's an impressive facility. I highly recommend everyone go see it.
 
#583      
Jack Buck was the voice of baseball for generations. His legacy shines 20 years later.

I loved listening to Jack. I learned most of my baseball from him. My Dad was second. This is only the opening and summary lines. It's well worth reading the whole article.

It has been 20 years, a generation, since the ubiquitous voice that nearly every St. Louisan immediately recognized last spoke.

But all this time later, the robust legacy of Jack Buck lives on.

It will be two decades on Saturday since iconic Cardinals broadcaster Buck succumbed to a variety of infirmities that had left him hospitalized for the final 5½ months of his nearly 78 years.

It mattered little whether you’d just seen Buck the night before or knew him only through your radio’s speaker. He was a friend and de facto family member to hundreds of thousands near and far, spread across the Cardinals’ massive radio network as well as the mighty reach of its flagship station, KMOX (1120 AM) in St. Louis. It’s a bygone, low-tech era in which announcer-listener relationships often were personal.

When Buck began calling Cardinals games, in 1954, St. Louis was the westernmost and southernmost outpost in the majors. Although the Athletics arrived in Kansas City the next year, the St. Louis broadcasters helped make the Cardinals the team in the eastern half of the South, the Southwest and Great Plains.

That loyalty has been handed down for generations, to this day leaving descendants of those fans Redbirds rooters even though there now are teams in Colorado and Texas, in addition to Kansas City.

Final thoughts​

When Buck died, the tributes poured in — not just via words, but also actions. Numerous people arrived from out of town for the funeral, some going to extremes to be there.
Former Cardinal Jack Clark was the Dodgers’ hitting coach at the time and flew from Los Angeles after the team’s game the night before the service, then flew back shortly afterward.
Entertainer Tony Orlando, who was friends with Buck for many years, performed in Las Vegas the previous evening, then flew to Los Angeles to connect to a red-eye flight to St. Louis. After the farewell, he flew back to Vegas in time to be on stage that night.
“I just felt the need to be there,” Orlando once said. “It was a worthy trip. ... I was tired, but mostly what tired me out was that it was draining to see the hurt in everybody. ... There was a solemnness, it was an amazing reaction from a city. I know this may be a stretch for some people, but not for people in St. Louis: It reminded me of when (President) John F. Kennedy died, the tremendous weight that was on the common person on the street. Everybody was feeling his loss. ... It was a privilege to know him, it was an honor to be there at his funeral.”
From celebrities to politicians to a high school kid vacuuming his car, Buck treated them the same.
“He’d make people feel important — and he never was fake,” Joe Buck said. “He wasn’t handed anything and he never forgot where he came from, a loving family. People appreciated that. Almost every day I hear from somebody who says he made a difference in their life.”
But it was Jack Buck who considered himself the lucky one. He once was asked what he would say to the Lord when he arrived in Heaven.
“I want to ask him why he’s been so good to me,” Buck said.
 
#584      
#585      

BillyBob1

Champaign
Hope they gove Herrera a chance over Knizner. Knizner is not a good catcher either offensively ot defensively. I have to imagine Hererra is better at framing than Knizner, who is one of the worst in the league at what is a pretty important skill for a catcher.

I was hoping they would look to acquire another catcher. As you said, he’s not adding much either side, offensively or defensively, and he is playing more than Yadi. And yadi’s offense has really dropped.
 
#588      

pruman91

Paducah, Ky

Derrick Goold
BOSTON — A rule of thumb Adam Wainwright learned as a young pitcher in Atlanta’s system and likely passed on to Michael Wacha as a young pitcher in the Cardinals’ system was to outlast the opposing pitcher.
Going deeper into the game means pitching well and going deeper into the game than the opposing pitcher means either the team has a lead or it still can chase one down.
In the first matchup as opponents for the former teammates and longtime friends, Wainwright pitched further into the game than Wacha. But when the offense gave chase, the gap was a run too much to close. Given a head start from Wacha’s strong 5⅓ innings, Boston pulled away against the Cardinals’ bullpen to fortify a lead and withstand the Cardinals’ ninth-inning threat. Down by five entering the ninth, the Cardinals got the tying run in scoring position but lost 6-5 at Fenway Park. The Cardinals got four extra base hits with two out in the ninth.

Back in Boston with the Cardinals for the first time since the 2013 World Series, Wainwright (5-5) held the Red Sox to a two-run game for most of his 6⅓ innings. He sidestepped seven hits, and in the second inning struck out the side for three of his five strikeouts.
Two Sox came unraveled that inning on Wainwright’s curve.
A leadoff triple to start the game and Trevor Story’s two-run single in the fourth inning were the only runs directly off Wainwright, though he was tagged with a fourth run allowed when the bullpen fractured and allowed the runs that meant a loss.
 
#589      

pruman91

Paducah, Ky

Derrick Goold
BOSTON — With the chance to move into second place all-time and continue his steady pursuit of a major-league record, the Cardinals considered whether Yadier Molina could make it through one more start Friday night at Fenway Park with Adam Wainwright — and then yield to persisting knee pain and go on the injured list.
“You know how much it has to hurt for that not to be the case,” manager Oliver Marmol said.
Nine starts shy of setting a major-league record for starts as a battery with Wainwright, Molina went on the 10-day IL Friday morning because of inflammation in his right knee. There is no timetable for his return, and the veteran catcher, who will turn 40 next month, has been prescribed several days of inactivity to reduce swelling in the knee.

Over the past week, the Cardinals and Molina have attempted a variety of ways to address the soreness, from anti-inflammatory injections to additional days off.
Molina caught Wednesday’s game but felt limited by pain, exhausted by it.
“He’s done everything possible to stay on the field,” Marmol said. “There’s playing through pain — which I think he’s done for the last 30 years in the league — and then there’s not being able to actually perform. It got to the point where it was too much. As much as he wants to be here today and catch Adam — That’s driven a lot of this too, right? — it’s no longer possible. A little bit of down time on the knee makes sense. And go from there.”
 
#591      

pruman91

Paducah, Ky

Derrick Goold
BOSTON — The giveaway was Adam Wainwright asking for a new baseball.
He thought for sure he would still be in the game to throw it.
As Cardinals manager Oliver Marmol walked to the mound to make what became a pivotal decision, Wainwright held up the used ball in his hand, trying to get the home-plate umpire’s attention. The ball had just been scraped as a groundball for the first out of the seventh inning. Boston had a runner at third base, and Wainwright had the matchup he welcomed against the Red Sox No. 9 hitter, Jackie Bradley Jr.
So how about that new ball?
As Marmol arrived at the mound, Wainwright tossed the discard to the bat boy.

He would not be around when the new ball arrived.
With two outs to get, a relatively new rule creating a bind and a matchup looming he wanted to avoid, Marmol opted for reliever T.J. McFarland instead of sticking with his veteran starter. What followed was a three-run burst that gave Boston exactly enough insurance to weather the Cardinals’ uprising in the ninth, one spearheaded by four two-out, extra-base hits. The difference in Boston’s 6-5 victory Friday at Fenway Park traced back to that moment when McFarland received the new baseball that Wainwright requested.
“I don’t think anyone is thrilled to come out of games,” Wainwright said. “I thought that was a good spot for me. That was a hitter I’ve had success against and a good situation where I’d like to hold it there. If you’ve got a starting pitcher who wants to come out of the game, he’s not a very good starting pitcher.”
 
#592      
Sure would be nice if McFarland would dissappear.
McFarland reminds me of Pete Falcone. The only thing he really had going for him was that he was a male lefthanded pitcher. He hung around the game for 10 years despite having an ERA over 4. His FIP 4.29 and WHIP 1.432 Every team needed one starter who was a lefty and St Lou, Mets and Atlanta trotted him out there every 5 days.
 
#593      

Derrick Goold
BOSTON — The giveaway was Adam Wainwright asking for a new baseball.
He thought for sure he would still be in the game to throw it.
As Cardinals manager Oliver Marmol walked to the mound to make what became a pivotal decision, Wainwright held up the used ball in his hand, trying to get the home-plate umpire’s attention. The ball had just been scraped as a groundball for the first out of the seventh inning. Boston had a runner at third base, and Wainwright had the matchup he welcomed against the Red Sox No. 9 hitter, Jackie Bradley Jr.
So how about that new ball?
As Marmol arrived at the mound, Wainwright tossed the discard to the bat boy.

He would not be around when the new ball arrived.
With two outs to get, a relatively new rule creating a bind and a matchup looming he wanted to avoid, Marmol opted for reliever T.J. McFarland instead of sticking with his veteran starter. What followed was a three-run burst that gave Boston exactly enough insurance to weather the Cardinals’ uprising in the ninth, one spearheaded by four two-out, extra-base hits. The difference in Boston’s 6-5 victory Friday at Fenway Park traced back to that moment when McFarland received the new baseball that Wainwright requested.
“I don’t think anyone is thrilled to come out of games,” Wainwright said. “I thought that was a good spot for me. That was a hitter I’ve had success against and a good situation where I’d like to hold it there. If you’ve got a starting pitcher who wants to come out of the game, he’s not a very good starting pitcher.”
This isn't the first time he has taken out Waino too early. At this point in his career, if says he has it... let him stay/
 
#594      

BillyBob1

Champaign

Derrick Goold
BOSTON — A rule of thumb Adam Wainwright learned as a young pitcher in Atlanta’s system and likely passed on to Michael Wacha as a young pitcher in the Cardinals’ system was to outlast the opposing pitcher.
Going deeper into the game means pitching well and going deeper into the game than the opposing pitcher means either the team has a lead or it still can chase one down.
In the first matchup as opponents for the former teammates and longtime friends, Wainwright pitched further into the game than Wacha. But when the offense gave chase, the gap was a run too much to close. Given a head start from Wacha’s strong 5⅓ innings, Boston pulled away against the Cardinals’ bullpen to fortify a lead and withstand the Cardinals’ ninth-inning threat. Down by five entering the ninth, the Cardinals got the tying run in scoring position but lost 6-5 at Fenway Park. The Cardinals got four extra base hits with two out in the ninth.

Back in Boston with the Cardinals for the first time since the 2013 World Series, Wainwright (5-5) held the Red Sox to a two-run game for most of his 6⅓ innings. He sidestepped seven hits, and in the second inning struck out the side for three of his five strikeouts.
Two Sox came unraveled that inning on Wainwright’s curve.
A leadoff triple to start the game and Trevor Story’s two-run single in the fourth inning were the only runs directly off Wainwright, though he was tagged with a fourth run allowed when the bullpen fractured and allowed the runs that meant a loss.

Wain’s one mistake was the 0-2 pitch to Story.
 
#595      

IlliniFan85

Colorado Springs, CO
What teams who will be seller's have a decent bullpen piece or two? We need to get rid of some of our slackers. I know MO is going to wait until it's probably too late but I wish he would get on it sooner rather than later. And no bargin bin guys. We have players in the minors who can be traded that won't hurt the future of the team.
 
#596      

IlliniFan85

Colorado Springs, CO
Sam Moll looks like he would be a great lefty option from Oakland. His ERA+ is 280 (100 is average player and 150 is 50% better than average. So 280 is way better than average). His SO/9 is great. However is BB/9 is terrible at 5.3. But it looks like he has a crap ton of team control so he might cost too much at this point. And he doesn't have a long track record either.


Paolo Espino is having a great year compared to his history. He is at 174 ERA+ in Washington. He might have a year or two of control still (I'm not really trying to figure this out really). His SO/9 isnt great but his BB/9 is. Since he gives up contact it should play well with our defense. He is 35 as well so might be cheaper. Could be similar to Luis Garcia last year but having a better year before picking him up. Obviously Washington is going to trade him. They have no need to hang on to him even if he has a year of team control.


BB and K per 9 reference page.
 
#597      

pruman91

Paducah, Ky

Derrick Goold
BOSTON — Before the game Saturday, manager Oliver Marmol detailed how the Cardinals outfielders had spent time already getting to know the random ricochets and confounding caroms that are all part of the character at Fenway Park.
Coaches and outfielders had thrown baseballs off the hand-operated scoreboard and off the top half of the Green Monster to see the difference. They had visited the triangle in center field where triples go to thrive. They had put in a cram session to play the foreign ballpark with its funky dimensions as well as they could, as close to the locals as possible.
And then the Cardinals never gave the Red Sox a chance to show that proficiency.

Off the wall?
The Cardinals went over it.
With a thunderous response to Friday’s one-run loss, the Cardinals socked three home runs, two to dead center and one over the Monster, and romped in a 11-2 victory against Boston. Nolan Arenado started the power show with a homer in the first inning. Nolan Gorman and Tyler O’Neill followed with homers that traveled 440 feet and 410 feet, respectively, to the seats askew in center. As the Cardinals added on later, they were still going over the wall. Andrew Knizner one-hopped the low barrier in right for an RBI ground-rule double.
The 11 runs were the most scored by the Cardinals in a regular-season game at Fenway. They hit three homers in a game at Fenway for the first time since doing it twice in June 2008.
 
#598      

pruman91

Paducah, Ky


Derrick Goold
BOSTON — Complete with a surprise visit and bear hug from Boston’s beloved slugger and newest Hall of Famer David Ortiz, the Red Sox celebrated Albert Pujols’ final regular-season weekend at Fenway Park and presented him, as a gift, a No. 5 from the Green Monster’s hand-operated scoreboard.
Ortiz handed Pujols’ the number at the mound, flanked by Michael Wacha, Rafael Devers, and Xander Bogaerts.
In the Red Sox clubhouse before the game Bogaerts echoed comments All-Star Manny Machado made earlier this season to the Post-Dispatch wondering why there had not been more presentations this season for Pujols. He saw it on the Ortiz farewell tour.

“It’s really cool for him to go back to St. Louis, end it that way,” Bogaerts said. “David went everywhere — went to San Diego and got a surfboard, went to Baltimore got the phone. Everywhere he went there was something he was getting. And (Pujols) is one of the best ever, one of the best all-time. I hope he plays one game here and maybe we’re winning by 10 and he hits a homer. Maybe an unearned run.”
It’s possible Pujols will start Sunday.
Cardinals manager Oliver Marmol acknowledged sentiment and the number of Cardinals fans in the Fenway crowd this weekend will be part of his decision.
“I do. I do,” he said. “It will weigh into it.”
 
#599      
It's a very small sample size but Zack Thompson has looked better in his 2 relief appearances than he did in his one start. The opponent OPS avg of .425 the first time through the batting order reflects this. It increases to .579 the second time and 1.5 the third time he faces a batter.