Illini Track & Field, Cross Country

#76      
My wife and I went for one day and it was just perfect! Transportation to Hayward was handled well, the multiple big screens made replays excellent. Only thing I'd say is that when it gets towards evening it's better to sit on the West side or the South end as the sun will be right in your eyes in the East and North areas.

I have a video from our seats saved somewhere, I'll see if I can find it.
When is the championship meet held? If after March 21st, the Sun will be setting to the northwest (meaning the rays should be hitting the south end).
 
#78      
When is the championship meet held? If after March 21st, the Sun will be setting to the northwest (meaning the rays should be hitting the south end).
Eugene is at about the 44th latitude, the sun starts heading south at the 45th, so it really isn't coming into Hayward from the NW.
 
#82      
Sorry, my friend, it still sets to the NW between the vernal and autumnal equinoxes … even in Eugene …(and Honolulu, for that matter) https://www.sunearthtools.com/dp/tools/pos_sun.php?lang=en
That looks like a pretty interesting link, I'm not sure what I'm looking at on that website. I put in the longitude and Latitude for Eugene, but still it's unclear what I'm looking at relative to Hayward Field. Perhaps you can explain it for me. I have a undergrad in history and an MBA with a finance focus I'm not afraid to learn new things that's for sure. Oh, and I have done a little engineering on the side (self taught mostly), came up with two ideas that resulted in patents, neither of which have my name on them but that's another story.
 
#83      
That looks like a pretty interesting link, I'm not sure what I'm looking at on that website. I put in the longitude and Latitude for Eugene, but still it's unclear what I'm looking at relative to Hayward Field. Perhaps you can explain it for me. I have a undergrad in history and an MBA with a finance focus I'm not afraid to learn new things that's for sure. Oh, and I have done a little engineering on the side (self taught mostly), came up with two ideas that resulted in patents, neither of which have my name on them but that's another story.
We’ll, to put it simply… The tilt of Earth's axis determines where the Sun appears in the sky throughout the year. During summer in the northern hemisphere, the Sun rises north of east and sets north of west. It is high in the sky at noon. During winter in the northern hemisphere, sunrise and sunset appear farther south along the horizon.

Here’s another link that may help: https://griffithobservatory.org/exh... Earth's axis,farther south along the horizon.
 
#84      
We’ll, to put it simply… The tilt of Earth's axis determines where the Sun appears in the sky throughout the year. During summer in the northern hemisphere, the Sun rises north of east and sets north of west. It is high in the sky at noon. During winter in the northern hemisphere, sunrise and sunset appear farther south along the horizon.

Here’s another link that may help: https://griffithobservatory.org/exhibits/ahmanson-hall-of-the-sky/sun-stars-paths/#:~:text=The tilt of Earth's axis,farther south along the horizon.
I'd agree that is a very simple explanation. From some of the "engineering" I did I learned that the air is thinner the further you get away from the equator. Actually, factored latitude into standard calculations for what I was doing at that time. So I'm not completely out of it.

I really don't think the griffith link makes your arguement. Although, it is fun to see your link for the "Ahmanson hall of the sky", the Ahmanson Foundation was a client of mine. Of course I've been retired for 13 years now.

Correct me if I'm wrong, at the furthest north, the sun is directly overhead at 23.5 latitude. Therefore, a location like Hayward Field, which is at 44 latitude, will never have the sun directly overhead, nor will the sun be north of Hayward Field, correct? Or am I missing something?
 
#85      
I'd agree that is a very simple explanation. From some of the "engineering" I did I learned that the air is thinner the further you get away from the equator. Actually, factored latitude into standard calculations for what I was doing at that time. So I'm not completely out of it.

I really don't think the griffith link makes your arguement. Although, it is fun to see your link for the "Ahmanson hall of the sky", the Ahmanson Foundation was a client of mine. Of course I've been retired for 13 years now.

Correct me if I'm wrong, at the furthest north, the sun is directly overhead at 23.5 latitude. Therefore, a location like Hayward Field, which is at 44 latitude, will never have the sun directly overhead, nor will the sun be north of Hayward Field, correct? Or am I missing something?
The Sun arcs through the sky. It’s only directly overhead in the tropics (between 23.5 degrees N and S) … but, because the earth is tilted on its axis (that 23.5 degrees with respect to the plane of the ecliptic) it rises and sets north of due east and west between the spring and fall equinoxes in the northern hemisphere.

So, if you’re seated in the south stands of the stadium at sunset and look due west, you’ll see the Sun setting to the north of that westerly point on the horizon (during spring and summer).
 
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#86      
The Sun arcs through the sky. It’s only directly overhead in the tropics (between 23.5 degrees N and S) … but, because the earth is tilted on its axis (that 23.5 degrees with respect to the plane of the ecliptic) it rises and sets north of due east and west between the spring and fall equinoxes in the northern hemisphere.

So, if you’re seated in the south stands of the stadium at sunset and look due west, you’ll see the Sun setting to the north of that westerly point on the horizon (during spring and summer).
Ok, however, Hayward Field is covered by a roof on the east, south and west, so sunset isn't a problem on the west or south, plus a chunk of the north west end is blocked by a video screen and scoreboard. Go to to see what I'm talking about haywarduoregon.edu/about